Author: Ink Jade Studio

(via Golden Phoenix Comb with Green Agate Gour…

(via Golden Phoenix Comb with Green Agate Gourd and Dark Pink Tassel | Ink Jade Studio)

Magnificent golden Chinese phoenix comb with a dark pink tassel features a cute lucky gourd carved out of green agate. Read more about gourd symbolism in Chinese culture here 🙂

http://primaltrek.com/gourd.html

ziseviolet: yansanniang: @川木晓贰 Traditional…

ziseviolet:

yansanniang:

@川木晓贰

Traditional Chinese Hanfu.

Are the lips of tang dynasty makeup suppose to…

Are the lips of tang dynasty makeup suppose to resemble flower petals?

Hi, thanks for the question! (Photos via 当小时)

image

Tang dynasty makeup, like the rest of Tang culture, was vibrant and glamorous. 

Florid styles of lip makeup were popular – the color of red for lips included red, light red, red with golden powder, pink, etc. Women first put powder onto the lips, and then drew any pattern they liked. During the Tang, many patterns for lip makeup were invented. According to one record, there were 17 patterns in the last 30 years of the dynasty. Below – depictions of Tang lip patterns by 睿汐_Sai:

image

Out of all the lip patterns, the most popular were the “cherry” lips and “flower petal” lips. Cherry lips refer to lips with the shape and color of a cherry. According to traditional Chinese beauty ideals, a beautiful woman should have a “cherry mouth” that resembles a cherry by being small, cherry-shaped, ruddy, and lustrous. Below – recreations by Chen Yen-hui:

image
image

Another famous pattern took the shape of a little flower – “flower petal” lips. To make it, women first made an obvious depression in the middle of the upper lip. Then the upper lip contour took the shape of two petals, and the lower lip another petal. 

image
image

There were many more Tang lip patterns, but the above two were the most popular.

Bonus – Here are some lip patterns from other Chinese dynasties (X). From left to right, top to bottom – Han, Wei, Song, Ming, Qing, Qing:

image

For more references on traditional Chinese lip makeup, please see my makeup tag.

Hope this helps! (Source)

From dawn to dusk I’m drunk and singing, loves…

From dawn to dusk I’m drunk and singing,
lovesick with every new spring.
There’s a messenger with letters in the rain;
there’s a broken-hearted girl by the window.
Rolling up beaded blinds, I see mountains;
each sorrow’s renewed like the grass.
Since last we parted, at your feasts
how often has the rafter dust fallen?

(via Silver Filigree Hair Stick with Iridescen…

(via Silver Filigree Hair Stick with Iridescent Glass Heart, Swans and Opal | Ink Jade Studio)

Chic silver filigree hair stick with iridescent glass heart and glass plum flower has an opulent dangle of opal, purple jade and lavender glass drop

Are the lips of tang dynasty makeup suppose to…

Are the lips of tang dynasty makeup suppose to resemble flower petals?

Hi, thanks for the question! (Photos via 当小时)

image

Tang dynasty makeup, like the rest of Tang culture, was vibrant and glamorous. 

Florid styles of lip makeup were popular – the color of red for lips included red, light red, red with golden powder, pink, etc. Women first put powder onto the lips, and then drew any pattern they liked. During the Tang, many patterns for lip makeup were invented. According to one record, there were 17 patterns in the last 30 years of the dynasty. Below – depictions of Tang lip patterns by 睿汐_Sai:

image

Out of all the lip patterns, the most popular were the “cherry” lips and “flower petal” lips. Cherry lips refer to lips with the shape and color of a cherry. According to traditional Chinese beauty ideals, a beautiful woman should have a “cherry mouth” that resembles a cherry by being small, cherry-shaped, ruddy, and lustrous. Below – recreations by Chen Yen-hui:

image
image

Another famous pattern took the shape of a little flower – “flower petal” lips. To make it, women first made an obvious depression in the middle of the upper lip. Then the upper lip contour took the shape of two petals, and the lower lip another petal. 

image
image

There were many more Tang lip patterns, but the above two were the most popular.

Bonus – Here are some lip patterns from other Chinese dynasties (X). From left to right, top to bottom – Han, Wei, Song, Ming, Qing, Qing:

image

For more references on traditional Chinese lip makeup, please see my makeup tag.

Hope this helps! (Source)

As I savored the warm porridge with a couple o…

As I savored the warm porridge with a couple of pickled lemons and cucumbers, I gazed at the crawling red ant that was frantically finding its way out of from the starchy rice circle that I had drawn on the granite counter. Surrounded by the glutinous fluid the ant was searching for a way out to live. A stream of memories of Fugui flooded my mind and I wondered how humans find the gist of survival through their darkest despair and how my belly did became alive again through the fragrance of a simple fare. What is it that makes a person jammed in a hell hole redefine the laws of death?

“When the chicken grew up it turned into a goose, the goose in turn grew into a lamb and the lamb became an ox…”

ziseviolet: hongvanngh: Ref for my OC, but it…

ziseviolet:

hongvanngh:

Ref for my OC, but it’s too beautiful to not spread the love

Lips make up in Tang Dynasty style

These are actually lip makeup styles from various Chinese dynasties. From left to right, top to bottom: Qing, Tang, Song, Ming, Wei, Tang, Qing, Han, Tang, Ming.

Red Auspicious Chinese Ruyi Cinnabar Bead Hai…


Red Auspicious Chinese Ruyi Cinnabar Bead Hair Stick Hair Pin

Classically elegant Chinese hair stick features a large cinnabar bead
carved with the auspicious Chinese characters “如意” (as you wish) on
opposing sides symbolizing that all your wishes will come true.

Available at my webshop: Ink Jade Studio 

The house and yard dressed in a skin of ash. I…

The house and yard dressed in a skin of ash.
It was raining embers, the night air thronged
with giddy petals that swirled
on the updraft, flared
to incandescence before curling into papery
ash, as we fled around midnight, my son
bewildered in my arms, his sister bright-eyed,
exclaiming, It’s snowing, Christmas just weeks away.

We sweep the aftermath like penitents, the air
acrid, shriven, ashen, as it was on the day
of Qing Ming, Clear Brightness, in another life,
when families filed to the tombs with broom,
rice wine, boiled whole chicken and fruits, and stacks
of paper money, gold and silver currency
valid only in afterlife. The dead were fed,
their abodes swept, and the filial queue
of joss offered. Then the money was given
in fanned reams to the flames, transferred
to replenish the ancestors’ underworld credit.
Once Grandma brought us to the cemetery,
dragging us in tow with armfuls of offerings,
filing up and down the crowded ranks
for the right address. I don’t remember whose grave
it was we were tending, or Grandma telling us
to pray. Only a blurred oval photo of a man
on the worn headstone, and the hundreds of fires
around us, the air swimming
with ash-drifts, the sun eclipsed in the smoke
but its heat made more palpable by the pall
that hung over the day. I imagined the ancestors
catching the burned money like willow catkins, turning
them into real millions that they could send back
to us to bail my father out of bankruptcy.

Now grave news from the living I have left;
the cemeteries are dug up, razed, the dead
expelled, their bones unhoused, ashed
and relocated to columbaria to make
room for progress. No more tomb-sweeping
and picnicking with the dead.
No such unrest for Grandma and Dad
who went straight into the fire.
Anyway they turned Catholic
and have no use for paper money
or earthly feasts.

Here the bush is charred, the trees
splintered, pulverised like Dad’s bones
after the fire. The ash taste clings
to the house, even after hosing and sweeping.
It seeps into my dreams, into the new life
I have made, and on my sleep it is still raining
ash, flakes falling like memory, on my dead settling
like a snowdrift of forgetting.