Author: Ink Jade Studio

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ziseviolet:

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Please note that whether the fashion of this era can be referred to as an AoQun (a type of hanfu) is highly questionable, as the presence of hanfu in the mainstream fashion beyond the Ming Dynasty has been, firstly banned by the Qing government, and secondly those few that remained has been so heavily influenced by Manchurian fashion to the point that arguably it has lost too many distinctive hanfu characteristics to be considered an AoQun.  

For example, referring to the clothes in the picture, there is a lack of the presence of a zhongfeng, which is widely considered a distinguishing characteristic of hanfu today. So whether these are considered hanfu is still up to debate, for now at least. 

P.S. for people who are new to this, please be aware that it is widely agreed that there are certain characteristics that hanfu must possess in order to be considered hanfu. Not all clothing worn by the Han Chinese people are considered hanfu… We wear jeans as well but those are clearly not hanfu are they…?

Yes, all good points! The modern Hanfu movement does not consider the Aoqun beyond the Ming dynasty to be Hanfu, for the reason you mentioned – it was heavily influenced by Manchurian fashion to the point that it became arguably too changed (including the lack of zhongfeng, aka center seam).

For comparison – here’s a Ming dynasty Aoqun, which is considered the “classic” Hanfu Aoqun:

And here’s a Republican-era Aoqun:

Chinese diaspora asking here: I saw the questi…

Chinese diaspora asking here: I saw the questions about making hanfu. Would it be weird for a girl to wear men’s hanfu? I kind of want to own either a zhiju(?) or yuanlingpao since seeing the drawings of female characters wearing yuanlingpao.

Hi, thanks for the question!

It’s definitely not weird for a girl to wear men’s Hanfu! Plus, as I mentioned in my post on unisex Hanfu, both Zhiju and Yuanlingpao are considered unisex garments, as they’ve historically been worn by both men and women. Some examples: 

Zhiju from 挽纱坊:

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Yuanlingpao from 重回汉唐:

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Especially in this day and age, you should feel free to wear whatever kind of Hanfu you like ^^ Hope this helps!

Is 璎珞 always worn on Ming dynasty Hanfu?

Is 璎珞 always worn on Ming dynasty Hanfu?

Hi! No, Yingluo/璎珞 is worn with many other Hanfu styles besides that of the Ming dynasty. As I mentioned in my previous post, Yingluo became fashionable during the Sui and Tang dynasties, and has been a popular ornament since then. So it can be worn with many different styles of Hanfu, including Tang, Song, Ming, etc. 

Some examples of Yingluo worn with non-Ming dynasty Hanfu styles via Niki-镜子:

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Hope this helps!

dressesofchina:

dressesofchina:

Tuánshà (circle fans) -themed brochets by Qian Zhongshi, founder of Shiji Classic Jewelry 狮记古典珠宝

ziseviolet: mickjeffrey: 清辉阁,移星陆 #汉服 #hanfu #…

ziseviolet:

mickjeffrey:

清辉阁,移星陆
#汉服 #hanfu #漢服文化 #漢服
原文網址:mobile.twitter.com

Traditional Chinese Hanfu.

Hi! I was wondering if there's a specific…

Hi! I was wondering if there's a specific word used for those large ring-like necklaces sometimes worn with hanfu?

Hi, thanks for the question!

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The large ring-like necklaces sometimes worn with Hanfu are called Xiangquan/项圈 (lit. “collar”). There’s a specific variety of Xiangquan that‘s often worn with Hanfu called Yingluo Xiangquan/璎珞项圈, which is fancier and involves more pieces than standard Xiangquan. Yingluo/璎珞 originates from ornaments called Keyura, which were made of gold, jade, and other valuable materials and worn on the head, neck, chest, arms, and legs by royalty and the wealthy in ancient India. The Sakyamuni Buddha was said to have also been adorned with this auspicious ornament when he was a prince, as was his mother when she gave birth to him. Keyura gradually came to adorn statues and paintings of Bodhisattvas and Buddhas:

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Later, Keyura was introduced into China with the spread of Buddhism, where it was called Yingluo. During the Sui and Tang dynasties, it was imitated and adapted by fashionable women, becoming a piece of high jewelry. Below – Yingluo in Chinese art (note: it was worn by children as well as adults):

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You can often see Xiangquan and Yingluo Xiangquan in Chinese dramas. For example, they are commonly used in drama adaptations of the classic novel Dream of the Red Chamber:

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Boys/Men wear them too!:

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Due to the Hanfu revival movement, Xiangquan and especially Yingluo Xiangquan are making comebacks as gorgeous and versatile Hanfu accessories:

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Please see my Yingluo tag for more resources. Hope this helps! 

All product photos are from Hanfu accessories brand 青荷记忆国风首饰.

Sources: 1, 2, 3

dressesofchina: National Treasure recreates T…

dressesofchina:

National Treasure recreates Tang-dynasty marble relief 彩绘散乐浮雕 at the Hebei Museum

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WvJS7XRhuoU

ziseviolet:

ziseviolet:

Traditional Chinese Hanfu.

dressesofchina:

dressesofchina:

Collaborative hanfu by宴山亭传统服饰定制_初六  with mobile game Ink, Mountains and Mystery 妙笔千山

ziseviolet:

ziseviolet:

Scenes from the Chinese iOS/Android game “Ink, Mountains, and Mystery“.