Category: ask

Hi! I love your blog! I have a question about …

Hi! I love your blog! I have a question about a type of accessory that I frequently saw in dramas. (Tried to find out about it myself but I can't read chinese.😣) Can you tell me what those beautiful hanging pendants of jade and tassels, tied to the waist, are called? Thank you for any information you have!

Hi! I’m glad you love my blog, and thanks for the question! (Illustration Via)

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Yaopei/腰佩 (lit. “waist wear”) is the general term for traditional Chinese waist ornaments, of which there are several types. Yaopei are typically decorated with jade (Yupei/玉佩), as the Chinese have revered jade since ancient times, and would (and still do) adorn themselves with it in various forms, including jewelry, hair ornaments, and waist ornaments. 

Those beautiful long pendants of jade and tassels

hanging from the waist that you see in Chinese dramas are a type of Yaopei called Jinbu/禁步. An accessory worn since ancient times, Jinbu was initially used to hold down the skirt. Below – Jinbu in the Chinese drama series Nirvana in Fire.

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Jinbu typically consists of one or more jades hanging in combination with beads and a decorative silk tassel (Liusu/流苏). Some of these jade stones are in the shape of bi-discs and Huang/璜, an arc shape with one hole on the top and two on the sides. 

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Apart from the symbolism of the jade and the beauty of the stone, the ancient Chinese appreciated the delicate tinkling sound the jades made as they touched each other when the wearer moved. Below – historical Ming dynasty gold-and-jade Jinbu (left), modern Tang-style gold Jinbu (right). 

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Worn by men and women, Jinbu served as symbols of virtue and emblems of rank. Below – illustrations of ladies from the Han dynasty (left) and Ming dynasty (right) wearing Jinbu.

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Due to the hanfu revival movement, the wearing of Jinbu is making a bit of a comeback. Below – modern Jinbu from 秋雨夕阳的店.

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Beautiful and versatile, Jinbu are a great way to accessorize any hanfu outfit.

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For more posts on Jinbu and other types of Yaopei, please see my waist ornament tag. 

Hope this helps!

Is it okay for someone chubby/fat to wear hanf…

Is it okay for someone chubby/fat to wear hanfu? I don't see many exemples of fat people wearing them, so i don't know if it's okay or if there is a better type of hanfu for fat people to wear… Sorry if i'm being annoying, have a good day 🐝

Hi, thanks for the question – you’re not being annoying at all!

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Of course it’s okay for someone chubby/fat to wear hanfu! As traditional Chinese clothing, hanfu is not limited to certain body sizes. 

While photos of plus-size people wearing hanfu are out there, I agree that they are rare. However, people are taking steps to remedy that – for example, here’s an article about a hanfu designer who is purposefully designing (and modeling) hanfu for plus-sized customers. All images in this post are from her online store.

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As you can see, Tang Dynasty-style hanfu (especially chest-high ruqun) is the most closely associated with fuller figures, since that was the beauty ideal of the time. However, feel free to wear whatever style you want – there’s no limit!

For further information on plus-size hanfu, please see this previous post.

Hope this helps!

Hello, I love your blog! I was wondering if yo…

Hello, I love your blog! I was wondering if you know of any brick and mortar hanfu shops in Shanghai?

Hi, I’m glad you love my blog!

Here is a list of brick and mortar hanfu shops in China, including their addresses and contact information (in Chinese only). According to the list, there are 5 brick and mortar hanfu shops in Shanghai.

Out of these, the one I recommend most is Chonghui Hantang/重回汉唐, since they’re one of the most established and well-known hanfu brands. They have an online Taobao shop, as well as several brick and mortar shops throughout China, including Shanghai. 

The Shanghai shop’s address is: 上海市闸北区延长路81号 (No. 81, Yanchang Road, Zhabei District, Shanghai). Their phone number is 021-56522181, and they have a Weibo blog here

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Hope this helps, and good luck!

Hi, I'm writing a bachelor about chinese…

Hi, I'm writing a bachelor about chinese fashion in XXI century, maybe you could help me? I need chinese fasion magazines from 2000 till 2018. maybe you know where i can get some scans or some magazines. I appreciate any help. 🙂

Hi, thanks for the question! 

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I’d recommend checking out Chinese fashion magazines’ official Weibo blogs, since they post a lot of their covers/photos/content there. Here are some of China’s current top fashion magazines, and their Weibo blogs (click for link):

1) Rayli

2) Vogue China

3) Elle China

4) Harper’s Bazaar China

5) L’Officiel China

6) Marie Claire China

Note: You won’t be able to see everything on the blog without creating/logging into your own Weibo account.

In addition, sites like Cfensi and blogs like Fuckyeahchinesefashion will regularly post Chinese fashion magazine scans. 

Hope this helps! (Image – Du Juan for Vogue China) 

Hi, do you happen to know the name of the mode…

Hi, do you happen to know the name of the model in this post? /post/173530873125/ He's in a lot of hanfu photoshoots but I've never been able to find his name.

Hi! Seems like a lot of people are curious about him ;D

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He’s a famous Chinese cosplayer and model from Chengdu, Sichuan who goes by Xiaomeng/小梦 (real name: Li Mengxi/李孟羲). As far as I know, the only social media he uses is Weibo – you can see his blog here.

He has almost 1.5 million followers on Weibo, and even has his own Baidu page.

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Not only is he a super accomplished cosplayer, he’s also a big advocate of the hanfu revival movement, and often wears hanfu in his daily life. 

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He occasionally does lovely hanfu photoshoots with his mom too :3

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All my posts of him are in my Coser小梦 tag. 

Hope this helps!

hello! i was wondering if you had any sources …

hello! i was wondering if you had any sources on how to make hanfu by hand! i wanted to try but my chinese isn't good enough to search;;

Hi, thanks for the question!

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English-language sources on how to make authentic hanfu by hand are scarce, but you can see the sources I have found in my “hanfu making” tag, particularly this and this.

Hope this helps, and good luck! ^^ (Image Via)

Hi! not sure if you have answered this or some…

Hi! not sure if you have answered this or something similar, but what type of Hanfu is worn in the show, The Empress of China? Especially the first one Fan Bingbing is wearing, with pink and green. Thank you for your help / time.

Hi, thanks for the question!

“The Empress of China” is set in the Tang Dynasty, so the clothing in the show is ostensibly based on Tang Dynasty fashions. However, as I explained in another post, most Chinese dramas set in ancient times do not have historically accurate costumes – the designs are usually exaggerated or changed in some way for aesthetic effect. This is definitely the case with “The Empress of China”.

Nevertheless, most of the women’s costumes in this show are based on the following hanfu styles, with varying degrees of accuracy:

1. Chest-high ruqun, an outfit consisting of a top (ru) and skirt (qun) in which the skirt is tied above the breasts or at the bust point. Like most outfits on this show, it’s accessorized with a long scarf called pibo and a large-sleeve outer robe called daxiushan. Fan Bingbing’s pink and green outfit is a chest-high ruqun:

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The chest-high ruqun + pibo + daxiushan coordination is very characteristic of the Tang Dynasty.

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2. Heziqun, an outfit that consists of the hezi (strapless chest cover, often embroidered), skirt (qun), and top (ru). The hezi is worn over the top, and a thin cloth belt is typically used to hide the joint between the hezi and skirt.

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Heziqun is one of the most popular hanfu styles in Chinese media portrayals of the Tang dynasty, and is probably the most depicted style in this show.

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3) Waist-high ruqun, which is a ruqun with the skirt tied at the waist. Below – waist-high ruqun with parallel collars (1st row) and crossed collars (2nd row):

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4) Banbi, a half-sleeve jacket commonly worn with ruqun. In the image below, the lady on the left is wearing a u-collar banbi, and the lady on the right is wearing a parallel-collar ruqun.

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5)

Yuanlingpao, a round-collar robe that was originally a male garment, but became fashionable for women to wear during the Tang Dynasty. It’s collar was often worn flipped open, as can be seen below.

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…And then there are outfits in which the costume designers took full creative liberty to mix-and-match different hanfu styles (and non-hanfu elements) as they saw fit 😛

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For the record, these are examples of what actual Tang Dynasty hanfu looked like:

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Hope this helps!

Hi, this is for a personal project, but may I …

Hi, this is for a personal project, but may I ask if you have resources for researching clothing of the three kingdoms period? In particular the wu kingdom? 吴国. Thanks in advance!

Hi, thanks for the question! 

Unfortunately English-language resources for clothing of the Three Kingdoms period are scarce, almost non-existent. However, I did find the following:

– “Ancient Hanfu” by Elaine Wu, an absolutely amazing historical overview of hanfu with a section on the Six Dynasties period (which includes the Three Kingdoms).

– Cfensi’s Sinology Sunday series has four entries that touch on clothing styles of the Three Kingdoms period: 1, 2, 3, 4.

From what I can tell, the clothing of the Three Kingdoms is very similar to that of the Han Dynasty (the preceding dynasty), so I recommend looking into Han Dynasty clothing and going from there. There is a lot more information and research out there on the Han Dynasty. For that, I recommend:

– Wikipedia’s article on Hanfu, Introduction to Hanfu, Guide to Hanfu (Chinese).

– Books: 1) Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei (online); 2) 5,000 years of Chinese Costume – According to nannaia, the book is “an invaluable resource in English (though sadly currently out of print), I would highly recommend this book if you can get your hands on it.”

Hope this helps!

How was the oldest form of Hanfu? Your blog …

How was the oldest form of Hanfu? Your blog is awesome!

Thank you! The oldest form of hanfu generally consists of underwears (shorts (hun), trousers (ku), tops (ru) etc.) and outerwears (robes (quju or zhiju)). Robes are generally for those who are more well off. Fabrics are pricey back then.

How was the oldest form of Hanfu? Your blog …

How was the oldest form of Hanfu? Your blog is awesome!

Thank you! The oldest form of hanfu generally consists of underwears (shorts (hun), trousers (ku), tops (ru) etc.) and outerwears (robes (quju or zhiju)). Robes are generally for those who are more well off. Fabrics are pricey back then.