Category: ask

Hi! Do you know if there's a particular n…

Hi! Do you know if there's a particular name for the looped hairstyles like these: i[.]pinimg[.]com/564x/44/57/36/445736c8e7a0ffd0399993a0bb6c84c0[.]jpg & i[.]pinimg[.]com/564x/6b/e3/41/6be341d1db1fdd490473697594ad782b[.]jpg (and were they actually from the Tang Dynasty like the source said?)

Hi, thanks for the question!

These two looped hairstyles, worn by Fan Bing Bing as Wu Zetian in the Chinese drama “The Empress of China”, are unique styles with individual names. The first style is called 双环望仙髻/Shuang Huan Wang Xian Ji (Double Hooped Immortal-Seeking Ji), and the second style is called 飞仙髻/Fei Xian Ji (Flying Immortal Ji). “Ji/髻” refers to any hairstyle involving pulling hair on top of the head. Let’s take a look at each one:

1. 双环望仙髻/Shuang Huan Wang Xian Ji (Double Hooped Immortal-Seeking Ji):

image

For this hairstyle, the hair is split into two parts, and black yarn or ribbons are used to form hoops above the head. For the finishing touch, a small Buyao (hairpin with decorations that swing as you walk) is added to the front. The hairstyle originally developed from an earlier style called 双环髻/Shuang Huan Ji (Double Hooped Ji), which was popular among single women and court ladies during the Wei/Jin and Northern & Southern dynasties. The Double Hooped Immortal-Seeking Ji was fashionable during the Tang – Song dynasties:

image

2. 飞仙髻/Fei Xian Ji (Flying Immortal Ji):

image

This hairstyle, which consists of two tall twin loops on either side of the head, first appeared during the Han dynasty. Legend has it that during that time, the Heavenly Mother of the Jade Palace visited Emperor Wu Di. He was so astounded by the visit that he recorded the flying immortals’ hairstyle, and asked his court maidens to imitate it. The Flying Immortal Ji is thus commonly used in depictions of immortals. It was also worn by young girls, as well as being a popular hairstyle for traditional dances and performances:   

image

To create the hairstyle, start with a high ponytail atop the head. Next, split the hair into two segments and form each into a loop, and then wrap the ends around the base of the ponytail. Use hairpins to keep the coils of hair in place, and reinforce with another hair tie as needed. Finally, decorate generously with hair accessories. Semiprecious stone pins, jade combs, and delicate ornaments of metal were popular choices of the past.

For a visual depiction of how the Flying Immortal Ji is created, there’s a helpful video tutorial here:

The back is just as beautiful as the front!

image

Hope this helps!

Sources: 1, 2, 3, 45

Hi! Do you know if there's a particular n…

Hi! Do you know if there's a particular name for the looped hairstyles like these: i[.]pinimg[.]com/564x/44/57/36/445736c8e7a0ffd0399993a0bb6c84c0[.]jpg & i[.]pinimg[.]com/564x/6b/e3/41/6be341d1db1fdd490473697594ad782b[.]jpg (and were they actually from the Tang Dynasty like the source said?)

Hi, thanks for the question!

These two looped hairstyles, worn by Fan Bing Bing as Wu Zetian in the Chinese drama “The Empress of China”, are unique styles with individual names. The first style is called 双环望仙髻/Shuang Huan Wang Xian Ji (Double Hooped Immortal-Seeking Ji), and the second style is called 飞仙髻/Fei Xian Ji (Flying Immortal Ji). “Ji/髻” refers to any hairstyle involving pulling hair on top of the head. Let’s take a look at each one:

1. 双环望仙髻/Shuang Huan Wang Xian Ji (Double Hooped Immortal-Seeking Ji):

image

For this hairstyle, the hair is split into two parts, and black yarn or ribbons are used to form hoops above the head. For the finishing touch, a small Buyao (hairpin with decorations that swing as you walk) is added to the front. The hairstyle originally developed from an earlier style called 双环髻/Shuang Huan Ji (Double Hooped Ji), which was popular among single women and court ladies during the Wei/Jin and Northern & Southern dynasties. The Double Hooped Immortal-Seeking Ji was fashionable during the Tang – Song dynasties:

image

2. 飞仙髻/Fei Xian Ji (Flying Immortal Ji):

image

This hairstyle, which consists of two tall twin loops on either side of the head, first appeared during the Han dynasty. Legend has it that during that time, the Heavenly Mother of the Jade Palace visited Emperor Wu Di. He was so astounded by the visit that he recorded the flying immortals’ hairstyle, and asked his court maidens to imitate it. The Flying Immortal Ji is thus commonly used in depictions of immortals. It was also worn by young girls, as well as being a popular hairstyle for traditional dances and performances:   

image

To create the hairstyle, start with a high ponytail atop the head. Next, split the hair into two segments and form each into a loop, and then wrap the ends around the base of the ponytail. Use hairpins to keep the coils of hair in place, and reinforce with another hair tie as needed. Finally, decorate generously with hair accessories. Semiprecious stone pins, jade combs, and delicate ornaments of metal were popular choices of the past.

For a visual depiction of how the Flying Immortal Ji is created, there’s a helpful video tutorial here:

The back is just as beautiful as the front!

image

Hope this helps!

Sources: 1, 2, 3, 45

Hi! I love your blog especially because it is …

Hi! I love your blog especially because it is such a carefully made blog in English! (Accessible to the sadly illiterate me). I wanted you ask if you have a tag for myrhically themes photoshoots? I remember some with antlers and such. Thank you!!

Hi, I’m glad you love my blog!

All of my mythology-related content can be found in my Chinese Mythology tag ^^

(Image: Fu Zhu-themed hanfu photo via)

Hey I just wanted to ask you if there were any…

Hey I just wanted to ask you if there were any websites you would recommend to buy Hanfu or Chinese Hair accessories from?

Hi, thanks for the question! (Image Via)

image

I created an individual page just to address that question – 

Where to buy Hanfu (and Hanfu Accessories). Please check it out!

In addition, you can check out my Hanfu Recommendations tag and Hair Accessories Recommendations tag. 

Hope this helps!

As was wondering if it's okay for non-Asi…

As was wondering if it's okay for non-Asians to wear hanfu or huadian?

Hi! The answer is a bit nuanced – please see the posts here, here, and here on the topic (these posts only touch on hanfu, but the reasoning applies to huadian as well).

Also, I do have a masterpost of all my replies to asked questions so far – please check it out! ^^

Do you know where the photoset of the girl is …

Do you know where the photoset of the girl is in all red and its snowing and it kind of looks like a castle was taken ? Sorry if this is unspecific but I just thought that photoset was one of the most beautiful I've seen. (Also I'm absolutely in love with your blog everything on it is so educational and awe-inspiring!)

Hi! I’m really happy to hear that you love my blog! <3

Regarding your question – you’re referring to this photoset, if I’m not mistaken. It was taken at the Chaotian Palace (朝天宫/Chaotian Gong) in Nanjing. The original source of the photoset is here.  It really is very beautiful, with all the snow, isn’t it? ^^

Hope this helps!

do you have a twitter or instagram?

do you have a twitter or instagram?

Hi! No, I do not have a twitter or instagram – although given the haphazard actions by Tumblr’s staff recently, it may be a good idea to create them…

do you have a twitter or instagram?

do you have a twitter or instagram?

Hi! No, I do not have a twitter or instagram – although given the haphazard actions by Tumblr’s staff recently, it may be a good idea to create them…

Is this hairstyle,peony pinned on her hairstyl…

Is this hairstyle,peony pinned on her hairstyle,outfit restricted to royal 👑 ladies only

Hi, thanks for the question! 

The painting you’re referring to is the famous Tang dynasty hand scroll by Zhou Fang, “Court Ladies Wearing Flowered Headdresses/簪花仕女图”. This scroll depicts five palace ladies and a maidservant amusing themselves in a garden.  

image

The court ladies’ hairstyle is called Gao Ji/高髻 (High Ji), also known as E Ji/峨髻 (Lofty Ji). “Ji/髻” refers to any hairstyle involving pulling hair on top of the head. Gao Ji was a popular hairstyle among Chinese women during the Tang dynasty. As its names indicate, it refers to a relatively high and full updo, decorated with hair ornaments. Tang culture celebrated fullness and glamour, and that aesthetic extended to hair as well. Tang women believed the higher the hair, the better, with some using wigs to achieve the desired look – it was not uncommon for the updo to reach over one foot in height. Gao Ji was beloved by all classes of women during the Tang dynasty.

Gao Ji came in several different varieties. The specific one you’re referring to, with the peony pinned to the top, is called Zan Hua Gao Ji/簪花高髻 (Flowered High Ji). This style involved a Gao Ji

embellished with huge peony or lotus blossoms, as well as gold hair ornaments.

The practice of wearing flowers expressed women’s admiration for the beauty of the blossoms, but also symbolized the fleeting nature of youth.

Zan Hua Gao Ji was especially popular among aristocratic women during the Tang dynasty.

image

Here are two modern depictions of the hairstyle:

image
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Regarding the court ladies’ outfits – the relatively low neckline and nearly floor-length sleeves of the gowns, and the wide gauze scarves worn as stoles or draped across the arms, are all characteristic of the high court fashion of the Tang dynasty. I also addressed the same question in my reply to you here, so please check it out.

Hope this helps!

Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Regular

thacmis replied to your post “I just want to say I love your blog. Tbh I’m not planning on wearing…”

I really really love your blog so much! Not just as a massive source of art inspiration and education, but you have such a great collection of photos just to look at. Thanks for running this blog!

 <3 Thank you very much for your kind words! <3