Category: chinese clothing

About your post/138897666907/hanfu-photoset-vi…

About your post/138897666907/hanfu-photoset-via-coser小梦-part-1-he-wears-tang , is it true that the yuanlingpao existed since the Han dynasty, since other sources say otherwise?

image

Hi, thanks for the question!

As I mentioned in the post that you’re referring to, the Yuanlingpao/圆领袍 (round-collar robe) did exist since at least the Han dynasty.

Some sources state that it appeared as early as the Shang Dynasty, as evidenced by jade figures unearthed from tombs during that time period. In the Han Dynasty, as clothing across China was gradually unified, Yuanlingpao was worn as an underwear. After the Northern dynasties, the Northern Wei dynasty established by the Xianbei people began to wear Yuanglingpao as a formal dress, and it became a popular garment in the Sui and Tang Dynasties to the end of the Ming Dynasty (Source).

Yuanlingpao is often confused with the “Hufu/胡服” (foreign clothes) of the Tang dynasty, which leads to misunderstandings about its historical origins, but they are not one and the same. For more information on the difference between the two, please see these detailed Quora replies: One and Two. They explain it much better than I could.

Hope this helps! (Image Via)

hi! do you know what kind of clothing would be…

hi! do you know what kind of clothing would be worn at funerals- both by the dead and the living. thank you in advance!

Hi! Traditionally, at funerals the deceased would wear burial clothes called Shouyi/寿衣, which has its collars crossed right-over-left, as opposed to the left-over-right collars of the living. The living would wear mourning clothes called Sangfu/丧服, which I wrote about in more detail in my post here – please check it out!

Do you have any resources/links for how to sew…

Do you have any resources/links for how to sew our own hanfu?

image

Hi! Yep, you can check out the following posts for resources/links for how to sew your own hanfu:

Sewing Hanfu

Making Hanfu by hand

Making Chest-high Ruqun

Hope this helps! (Image Via)

Regular

fate-magical-girls
replied to your post “daolunofshiji
replied to your post “Excuse me, do you know anything…”

The treatment of prostitutes varied through different dynasties. However, after the Warring States, prostitutes were generally divided into government-run and personal-run brothels. Cities would have pleasure quarters where prostitutes did their business. While the Song and Yuan dynasties had a dress code for brothel workers, in general prostitutes wore the same clothing as other higher middle class women.

Thanks for the info!

Are hanfu as comfy as they look? It seems like…

Are hanfu as comfy as they look? It seems like a lot of fun to wear so many loose layers of beautiful billowing fabric, but idk if maybe the few places they're cinched or something makes them uncomfortable.

Hi, thanks for the question!

As I mentioned in a previous post, Hanfu is generally quite comfy and fun to wear – it just takes some getting used to, because it’s different from the “modern” clothing we’re used to wearing. Also, the level of comfort varies depending on several factors: the style of Hanfu, the type of fabric, the size of the sleeves (narrower sleeves are inevitably more comfortable than larger ones), and the amount of layering. I personally have worn the Hanfu styles of waist-high Ruqun, Banbi, and Quju, of which I’ll share my thoughts:

1. Waist-high Ruqun – Currently the most popular Hanfu style, and also one of the most comfortable. The skirt ties must be wrapped securely around the waist to hold the outfit together, but I didn’t find it constricting.

image

The only slight challenge was in making sure that the Ru (top) didn’t get loosened from its position under the waistband of the skirt (this is especially important for parallel-collar ruqun).

image

As for chest-high Ruqun – I personally haven’t worn it before, but I have posts discussing whether such styles are restrictive for the chest – please check them out here and here!

image

2. Banbi (half-sleeve jacket) – Typically worn over Ruqun, Banbi is extremely comfortable and a great way to accessorize an outfit. It can be worn either over the skirt (untucked), or tucked into the skirt.

image

If worn tucked into the skirt, you again need to be careful about the bottom of the Banbi coming loose from underneath the waistband of the skirt.

image

3. Quju (curved-hem robe) – This style of Hanfu is a bit higher on the difficulty scale, because: 1) it has large sleeves by default, 2) if wearing a short Quju, you must wear an underskirt, 3) since the robe wraps around the body in multiple layers below the waist, your lower body movement is necessarily constrained to a degree.

image

Nevertheless, based on my experience Quju is still quite comfy to wear, especially those made of lighter fabric as opposed to thicker fabric. You just can’t really run, or walk with large strides 😛

image

The Zhiju is also a one-piece garment like the Quju, but I imagine it’s more comfortable because it doesn’t wrap around the lower body in multiple layers, leaving movement unconstrained.

image
image

As for the many other Hanfu types (Beizi, Aoqun, Daxiushan, etc) which I haven’t worn (or discussed), hopefully some followers who have will be able to share their thoughts.

Hope this helps!

Images via 重回汉唐梨花渡, 汉尚华莲, 如梦霓裳

Hello, I was wondering what the name of the ha…

Hello, I was wondering what the name of the hat in /post/183107607910/ is? I think it's a hat worn by scholars but I am not sure, thank you

image

Hi! The name of the hat in this post is SiFang PingDing Jin (四方平定巾), which means “four-cornered flat cap”. It’s also known simply as Fangjin (方巾) for short. It’s distinguished by the fact that its four corners are all (approximate) right angles. Fangjin was typically worn by Confucian scholars and priests during the Ming dynasty. Here are some examples of Fangjin in historical art:

image
image
image

Hope this helps!

Hello, sorry if this has been asked before, bu…

Hello, sorry if this has been asked before, but I'm new to Chinese dramas. The drama I'm watching is 萌妃驾到 (Mengfei Comes Across) and I noticed some of the ladies had floral tattoos on their back. Would this (tattooing) happen to be a part of the time period or just a costume/style choice for the show? Thank you!

image

Hi! The tattooing, as far as I know, is just a costume/style choice for the show. You can read more in my previous replies on “Consort Meng Arrives” here, here, and here ^^

can i just say that ive recently gotten into a…

can i just say that ive recently gotten into a fandom set in a version of ancient china and your blog has been EXTREMELY helpful in designing other outfits for characters thank you so much

image

You’re welcome! Glad my blog has been helpful ^^

(Image Via)

So I’m watching Consort Meng Arrives and…

So I’m watching Consort Meng Arrives and they seem to have real flowery stuffed down the back of their dresses. Is this real?

Hi! Please check out my reply here ^^

Hello, I've been watching this drama call…

Hello, I've been watching this drama called Mengfei comes across. A lot of the consorts seem to wear bouquets of flowers in their skirts, and seem to have what looks like watercolor floral tattoos, and I was wondering what the significance of those were. Thank you for your beautiful blog! I love all the the reference posts ❤

Hi, thank you for the kind words! Please see my reply here regarding the flowers in the skirts. As for the watercolor floral tattoos – I think those are also stylistic accents added for aesthetic effect. Hope this helps!