Category: chinese clothing

hanfugallery:

hanfugallery:

Traditional Chinese hanfu by 界音

changan-moon:

changan-moon:

Traditional Chinese hanfu for archery by 夏雪憶夢

hanfugallery:Traditional Chinese hanfu by _粥小白…

hanfugallery:

Traditional Chinese hanfu by _粥小白

hanfugallery: 青蛇 by 夏弃疾_

hanfugallery:

青蛇 by 夏弃疾_

fuckyeahchinesefashion: Chinese fashion | Spr…

fuckyeahchinesefashion:

Chinese fashion | Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter 春夏秋冬. Photography by 摄影师蝈蝈小姐

Hello, I’m not sure if this was asked be…

Hello, I’m not sure if this was asked before but can non-Chinese people wear Hanfu?

Please see my reply to this question here ^^

Um if you don't mind me asking, what is t…

Um if you don't mind me asking, what is the hat disk with the veil called? Thanks for your time! (I hope I'm not a bother)

Hello! Of course it’s not a bother, I like to help! 🙂

The veiled hat is called “wéimào/帷帽”. I wrote a little on it in this post, and I also have a weimao tag. Below: historical weimao.

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The original form of the weimao was the “mìlí/幂蓠”, a hat with a body-long veil that originated from the foreign cultures of the northwest. The mili became popular during the Sui dynasty (581-618), especially among ladies of the nobility who rode horses on public roads. The fancier veils were adorned with jade and kingfisher feathers. Below: mili in a historical drama.  

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The mili’s veil shortened toward the end of the Sui, and the new wide-brimmed hat with shoulder-length veil was known as a weimao. During the Tang dynasty (618-907), the weimao became so popular that edicts to wear the more modest mili were ignored. It was popular not just among palace women, but also among commoners who followed their lead. Below: weimao in historical dramas.

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Hope this helps! 🙂

Edit: See this post by fate-magical-girls for more information on the history/evolution of mili & weimao.

Can people who are not chinese wear traditiona…

Can people who are not chinese wear traditional Hanfu?

Hi, thanks for the question!

So this can be a contentious issue with a lot of varying opinions. Just speaking for myself – I personally have no issue with people who aren’t Chinese wearing traditional hanfu if it’s done respectfully.

For example, every so often Chinese news will report on foreign students/visitors being invited to wear hanfu while participating in cultural activities (festivals, ceremonies, weddings, even graduation photos), which I think is great to see ^^

ziseviolet: Traditional Chinese Hanfu Street F…

ziseviolet:

Traditional Chinese Hanfu Street Fashion 

Influenced by the hanfu revival movement, more Chinese youth are wearing traditional hanfu casually as a form of fashion and self-expression.

Photos via 街拍滚叔,

街拍老夏小杰街拍她街拍.

Traditional Chinese Hanfu Street Fashion Influ…

Traditional Chinese Hanfu Street Fashion 

Influenced by the hanfu revival movement, more Chinese youth are wearing traditional hanfu casually as a form of fashion and self-expression.

Photos via 街拍滚叔,

街拍老夏小杰街拍她街拍.