Category: chinese culture

(via Golden Phoenix Comb with Green Agate Gour…

(via Golden Phoenix Comb with Green Agate Gourd and Dark Pink Tassel | Ink Jade Studio)

Magnificent golden Chinese phoenix comb with a dark pink tassel features a cute lucky gourd carved out of green agate. Read more about gourd symbolism in Chinese culture here 🙂

http://primaltrek.com/gourd.html

(via Silver Filigree Hair Stick with Iridescen…

(via Silver Filigree Hair Stick with Iridescent Glass Heart, Swans and Opal | Ink Jade Studio)

Chic silver filigree hair stick with iridescent glass heart and glass plum flower has an opulent dangle of opal, purple jade and lavender glass drop

Are the lips of tang dynasty makeup suppose to…

Are the lips of tang dynasty makeup suppose to resemble flower petals?

Hi, thanks for the question! (Photos via 当小时)

image

Tang dynasty makeup, like the rest of Tang culture, was vibrant and glamorous. 

Florid styles of lip makeup were popular – the color of red for lips included red, light red, red with golden powder, pink, etc. Women first put powder onto the lips, and then drew any pattern they liked. During the Tang, many patterns for lip makeup were invented. According to one record, there were 17 patterns in the last 30 years of the dynasty. Below – depictions of Tang lip patterns by 睿汐_Sai:

image

Out of all the lip patterns, the most popular were the “cherry” lips and “flower petal” lips. Cherry lips refer to lips with the shape and color of a cherry. According to traditional Chinese beauty ideals, a beautiful woman should have a “cherry mouth” that resembles a cherry by being small, cherry-shaped, ruddy, and lustrous. Below – recreations by Chen Yen-hui:

image
image

Another famous pattern took the shape of a little flower – “flower petal” lips. To make it, women first made an obvious depression in the middle of the upper lip. Then the upper lip contour took the shape of two petals, and the lower lip another petal. 

image
image

There were many more Tang lip patterns, but the above two were the most popular.

Bonus – Here are some lip patterns from other Chinese dynasties (X). From left to right, top to bottom – Han, Wei, Song, Ming, Qing, Qing:

image

For more references on traditional Chinese lip makeup, please see my makeup tag.

Hope this helps! (Source)

Are the lips of tang dynasty makeup suppose to…

Are the lips of tang dynasty makeup suppose to resemble flower petals?

Hi, thanks for the question! (Photos via 当小时)

image

Tang dynasty makeup, like the rest of Tang culture, was vibrant and glamorous. 

Florid styles of lip makeup were popular – the color of red for lips included red, light red, red with golden powder, pink, etc. Women first put powder onto the lips, and then drew any pattern they liked. During the Tang, many patterns for lip makeup were invented. According to one record, there were 17 patterns in the last 30 years of the dynasty. Below – depictions of Tang lip patterns by 睿汐_Sai:

image

Out of all the lip patterns, the most popular were the “cherry” lips and “flower petal” lips. Cherry lips refer to lips with the shape and color of a cherry. According to traditional Chinese beauty ideals, a beautiful woman should have a “cherry mouth” that resembles a cherry by being small, cherry-shaped, ruddy, and lustrous. Below – recreations by Chen Yen-hui:

image
image

Another famous pattern took the shape of a little flower – “flower petal” lips. To make it, women first made an obvious depression in the middle of the upper lip. Then the upper lip contour took the shape of two petals, and the lower lip another petal. 

image
image

There were many more Tang lip patterns, but the above two were the most popular.

Bonus – Here are some lip patterns from other Chinese dynasties (X). From left to right, top to bottom – Han, Wei, Song, Ming, Qing, Qing:

image

For more references on traditional Chinese lip makeup, please see my makeup tag.

Hope this helps! (Source)

Have some modern hanfus in your life (Part 1/?…

Have some modern hanfus in your life (Part 1/?)

Because I need it…

Red Auspicious Chinese Ruyi Cinnabar Bead Hai…


Red Auspicious Chinese Ruyi Cinnabar Bead Hair Stick Hair Pin

Classically elegant Chinese hair stick features a large cinnabar bead
carved with the auspicious Chinese characters “如意” (as you wish) on
opposing sides symbolizing that all your wishes will come true.

Available at my webshop: Ink Jade Studio 

Can a Dish Ever Taste as Good as It Does in Ou…

Can a Dish Ever Taste as Good as It Does in Our Memory?: undefined

What I think about when I think about Singapor…

What I think about when I think about Singaporean Chinese culture:

We were trying to practise texting in Chinese.

“Hao qi dai,” she wrote, a phrase that has a kind of bright-eyed earnestness similar to “can’t wait”.

I told my friend, a Singaporean who has spent many years overseas,
the phrase was a lot more likely to come out of the mouth of a Taiwanese
than a Singaporean. It was just too effusive and thus unlike the
Mandarin used here – what you hear in food courts, for example – which, I
would argue, tends to have a gruff quality.

This got me thinking about what defines Singaporean Chineseness, a
topic Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong spoke about recently at the opening
of the Singapore Chinese Cultural Centre in Shenton Way.

Photo

Photo

changan-moon:

changan-moon:

Traditional Chinese hanfu by 司南阁