Category: Chinese

Hi! I enjoy your blog because it offers much i…

Hi! I enjoy your blog because it offers much information and is aesthetically pleasing! I was wondering if you could talk about the shoes? What did people wear back in the days? And what are proper and fitting to wear today if you are wearing hanfu? Thank you.

Hi, I’m glad you enjoy my blog! ^^

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There are several posts about historical Chinese shoes on my blog – please check them out!:  

Traditional Chinese Upturned-Toe Shoes

– Ancient Chinese Shoe Tip Styles

Han Dynasty Shoes

Today, when wearing Hanfu, most people wear traditional Chinese cloth shoes that are decorated with embroidered designs. The most formal type of shoe is the 翘头履/Qiao Tou , which is a type of shoe with an upturned toe. The upturned toe was historically used to hold the hem of the Hanfu up, so it wouldn’t drag on the ground. Below – examples of modern Qiao Tou Lǚ with different styles of upturned-toe shoe tips:

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More casual and commonly worn is the 弓鞋/Gong Xie, which has a less exaggerated upturned toe:

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As you can see, nowadays it’s quite trendy for such shoes to have lace-up ribbons and embellishments such as pearls.

Another type of shoe that’s commonly worn with modern Hanfu is the traditional Chinese boot called 靴/Xue. This type of shoe is often worn by men:    

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Bonus – you can wear the shoes with traditional Chinese socks called 袜/Wa:

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For more references, please see my Shoes tag. Hope this helps!

Sources/images: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

ziseviolet: yansanniang: 一只鲤鱼精 @ 流云蕊 …

ziseviolet:

yansanniang:

一只鲤鱼精

@

流云蕊

Traditional Chinese Hanfu.

TV Drama Highlights Gender Discrimination in C…

TV Drama Highlights Gender Discrimination in Chinese Families:

「You’re a girl,」 the mother says, her tone dripping with bitterness. 「How can you compare with your two elder brothers?」

Lines
like this are why so many people in China are talking about 「All Is
Well,」 a drama series whose sexist slights and subplots are all too
relatable to many female viewers. Since the series’ March 1 premiere,
its hashtag has been viewed nearly 1.2 billion times on microblogging platform Weibo.

I have been watching this show and it’s amusing because in one of the episodes, the father is shown watching Nirvana on Fire I on TV and I realized that the actor playing the eldest son also played Crown Prince Xiao Jingxuan (I had some trouble recognizing him sans moustache) in Nirvana on Fire I whereas the actor playing the second son also played the role of the creepy priest Puyang Ying in Nirvana on Fire II

ziseviolet: yansanniang: @摄影师小雅 Traditiona…

ziseviolet:

yansanniang:

@摄影师小雅

Traditional Chinese Hanfu.

ziseviolet: yansanniang: 《美人卷》 @-薄荷白…

ziseviolet:

yansanniang:

《美人卷》

@-薄荷白

Traditional Chinese Hanfu.

ziseviolet:

ziseviolet:

Traditional Chinese Hanfu.

Hey there! I checked your blog and found it to…

Hey there! I checked your blog and found it to be absolute amazing! Thank you for sharing so much about chinese culture and information with us ^-^ Uh… so, I wanted to ask if you know some tips to drawing a huadian when you don't know how to paint well…? It might sound a bit dumb but… Or maybe I should just practice?

Hi! Glad to hear you like my blog! ^^ (Image via)

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I’ve actually never drawn huadian/花钿 before, but I did find some Youtube makeup tutorials that depict how to draw huadian. For example, the tutorial below utilizes a lip brush and red lipstick to create a simple 3-petal huadian. Generally, when it comes to learning how to draw things well, all it takes is some practice!

However, the easiest and most commonly used method nowadays is temporary tattoos! There’s a huge variety of huadian tattoos available on Taobao, and they come in many different designs and colors. Below – a typical set of huadian tattoos from Taobao:

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If you find painting huadian too difficult or if you want more complex designs, then I recommend using temporary huadian tattoos ^^. Hope this helps!

ziseviolet:

ziseviolet:

Traditional Chinese Hanfu.

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ziseviolet:

ziseviolet:

Traditional Chinese Hanfu.