Category: hairstyles

hanfugallery: Chinese hanfu hair style of We…

hanfugallery:

Chinese hanfu hair style of Weijin period 魏晋风汉服发型教程

whitehorseisnotahorse: the50-person: xiao3la…

whitehorseisnotahorse:

the50-person:

xiao3la4jiao1:

 A collection of art depicting Chinese women’s hairstyles over the years, from

行者先生 on weibo (link

It’s obvious how beauty standards have evolved greatly over the years…what one might consider a beauty in the past might not be the same now, and vice versa. 

Tbh, if the Four Great Beauties all time-travelled to the present, I wonder if they’ll still be as praised?

Also, whenever someone says they like Tang Dynasty makeup and hairstyles, I’m usually all ‘you know what you’re saying?’ because while Tang hanfu is lovely, the makeup and hair isn’t exactly what people now (2010s) will consider flattering.

While Tang dynasty makeup can be a bit Out There* it doesn’t hold a candle to the face-wide crimson shading and applique crystals look the Song empresses seem to have been going for. (I’m pretty ignorant about what may have led to any of those things being popular, or whether this is something restricted to imperial women, so if anyone has anymore info, give me a plug!)

I love how the crowns have full sets of figurines crafted into them!

* Although those moth eyebrows speak to my soul. 

Fig. 1 

The Official Imperial Portrait of Empress Liu (969–1033) (detail), hanging scroll, Palace Museum Taipei

Fig. 1  The Official Imperial Portrait of Empress Zheng (1079–1131)

(detail), hanging scroll, Palace Museum Taipei

Fig. 1  The Official Imperial Portrait of Empress Wu (1114–1197)

(detail), hanging scroll, Palace Museum Taipei

(link for first pick) (link for the second pic) (link to source for the third pic) 

whitehorseisnotahorse: the50-person: xiao3la4…

whitehorseisnotahorse:

the50-person:

xiao3la4jiao1:

 A collection of art depicting Chinese women’s hairstyles over the years, from

行者先生 on weibo (link

It’s obvious how beauty standards have evolved greatly over the years…what one might consider a beauty in the past might not be the same now, and vice versa. 

Tbh, if the Four Great Beauties all time-travelled to the present, I wonder if they’ll still be as praised?

Also, whenever someone says they like Tang Dynasty makeup and hairstyles, I’m usually all ‘you know what you’re saying?’ because while Tang hanfu is lovely, the makeup and hair isn’t exactly what people now (2010s) will consider flattering.

While Tang dynasty makeup can be a bit Out There* it doesn’t hold a candle to the face-wide crimson shading and applique crystals look the Song empresses seem to have been going for. (I’m pretty ignorant about what may have led to any of those things being popular, or whether this is something restricted to imperial women, so if anyone has anymore info, give me a plug!)

I love how the crowns have full sets of figurines crafted into them!

* Although those moth eyebrows speak to my soul. 

Fig. 1 

The Official Imperial Portrait of Empress Liu (969–1033) (detail), hanging scroll, Palace Museum Taipei

Fig. 1  The Official Imperial Portrait of Empress Zheng (1079–1131)

(detail), hanging scroll, Palace Museum Taipei

Fig. 1  The Official Imperial Portrait of Empress Wu (1114–1197)

(detail), hanging scroll, Palace Museum Taipei

(link for first pick) (link for the second pic) (link to source for the third pic) 

Back portraits of Chinese women depicted in hi…

Back portraits of Chinese women depicted in historical art, by Chinese artist -阿舍- (Source). These portraits faithfully display the hanfu, accessories, and hairstyles of their respective time periods. See more art from the artist here.

Notes from the artist:

1: A Ming dynasty empress.

2: A lady from the Tang dynasty painting “The Eighty-seven Immortals”.

3: A lady from the Yongle Palace Murals.

4-5: A lady (4) and a maid (5) from the Tang dynasty painting “Court Ladies Preparing Newly Woven Silk"

6: A lady from the Tang dynasty painting “Court Ladies Wearing Flowered Headdresses".

7-8: No comments.

9: Referenced from the book “Hanjin Clothing”.

how did the ming dynasty women style their hai…

how did the ming dynasty women style their hair?

Hi, thanks for the question!

image

From 1368, after seizing power from the Mongolian-ruled Yuan dynasty, the Ming dynasty adjusted the rituals that did not conform to the customs of the Han people, adopting and restoring the systems and customs of the Tang and Song dynasties. The hairstyles of Ming women were not as rich as those of the Tang and Song, but nevertheless had their own unique characteristics. Below – Common Ming hairstyles:

image

The early Ming inherited the hairstyles of the Song and Yuan. After the Jiajing period

(1522–66), women’s hairstyles changed significantly. The Taoxinji/桃心髻 was a fashionable hairstyle at that time. The hair was combed into an oblate shape, and the top decorated with flowers. Later, it evolved into a filigree knot, with the hair combed high & the dome decorated with precious jewels. The hairstyle had many variations as well. Below – Taoxinji in the Chinese TV series Dream of the Red Chamber:

image

Another popular Ming hairstyle was the

Diji/狄髻, a small wig-hat in the shape of a pyramid & decorated with ornaments:

image

The Diji developed from the special hairstyles and crowns of the Song, and was worn

by married women for formal occasions during the Ming. It was often made of silver wire, gold wire, horsetail, silk, hair, paper, fabric, etc. The outside was usually covered with black yarn, which was shaped like a cone and covered the hair on top of the head. A large variety of jewelry could be attached to the hat, the number depending on occasion and preference. For more examples, please see my Diji tag.

image
image

Mo’e/抹额 were forehead/hair bands that originated from the Spring and Autumn/Warring States periods, and were most popular during the Ming dynasty. Women wrapped the bands around their forehead, and the fabric in front was usually decorated with embroideries and/or jewels. Below – Mo’e in Dream of the Red Chamber:

image

Finally, we can’t discuss Ming dynasty hairstyles without mentioning the gorgeous Fengguan/凤冠 (phoenix crown) worn by Ming noblewomen for ceremonies and formal occasions. It was also the traditional headwear for Ming brides (including common-folk):

image

Fengguan were adorned with a variety of ornaments: phoenixes made of inlaid kingfisher feathers, as well as gold dragons, beaded pheasants, pearls, and other gemstones. The numbers of phoenixes, dragons, and precious gems on each crown was different, depending on rank. For more examples, please see my Fengguan tag.

image

Of course, there are a lot more Ming women’s hairstyles that I haven’t covered, but this does describe some of the most popular and iconic Ming styles. For more references, please check out my Ming Dynasty tag.

image

Hope this helps! (Illustration Via)

Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4

fouryearsofshades: inkjadestudio: fouryearso…

fouryearsofshades:

inkjadestudio:

fouryearsofshades:

饰品是楼主在北京学习期间制作的,并且不是我一个人制作的,我只负责了满冠和钿子,其余饰品均为他人作品。没有过程,只有图片供欣赏,转载请注明出处。

化妆造型:燕呢喃

麻豆:拈花一笑

【汉风徽韵汉志社琅鬟司】明制狄髻造型试做

OP 燕呢喃_0615

She’s wearing a wig on top right?

Yes. A hat-wig.

Hi! Okay so, I'm trying to do my first OO…

Hi! Okay so, I'm trying to do my first OOAK doll based on Mulan, and her story goes back to about 500AD, right? I found the history of hanfu post and a couple of them overlap. Can you help me narrow down what Mulan might have actually worn when not on the battlefield?

Hi, thanks for the question!

The historic setting of Mulan is the Northern and Southern dynasties period (420–589), specifically the Northern Wei dynasty (386–536). 

During the Northern Wei dynasty, women usually wore two-piece ruqun/襦裙. The cross-collared tops (“ru”) of the ruqun were mostly simple and short, whereas the skirts (“qun”) were elaborate, and wrapped tightly around the waist. The sleeves were excessively wide. Below – Northern Wei figures of young women (X):

image
image

As you can see, one of the most distinctive features of Northern Wei hanfu was the collar, which was much wider and open at the top compared to collars during other periods of Chinese history. The collars were so wide as to render visible the circular-collared undergarments women wore underneath their tops. Below – historical recreation of Northern Wei ruqun (X):

image

As for the skirts, they were wrapped relatively high around the waist, with the ends of the sash trailing down the front. The skirts were typically long and finely pleated. Below – additional historical recreations of Northern Wei ruqun from 裝束复原 and 朝代復原体验

image
image
image

Finally, when it came to hairstyles, Northern Wei women tended to do their hair up into two buns, in order to look slender and more elegant (X):

image

I hope this helps give you a better idea of what Mulan might have actually worn when not on the battlefield, and good luck! Also, if anyone has more insights into Northern Wei hanfu, please do share! ^^

Sources: 1, 2, 3

Hi! Okay so, I'm trying to do my first OO…

Hi! Okay so, I'm trying to do my first OOAK doll based on Mulan, and her story goes back to about 500AD, right? I found the history of hanfu post and a couple of them overlap. Can you help me narrow down what Mulan might have actually worn when not on the battlefield?

Hi, thanks for the question!

The historic setting of Mulan is the Northern and Southern dynasties period (420–589), specifically the Northern Wei dynasty (386–536). 

During the Northern Wei dynasty, women usually wore two-piece ruqun/襦裙. The cross-collared tops (“ru”) of the ruqun were mostly simple and short, whereas the skirts (“qun”) were elaborate, and wrapped tightly around the waist. The sleeves were excessively wide. Below – Northern Wei figures of young women (X):

image
image

As you can see, one of the most distinctive features of Northern Wei hanfu was the collar, which was much wider and open at the top compared to collars during other periods of Chinese history. The collars were so wide as to render visible the circular-collared undergarments women wore underneath their tops. Below – historical recreation of Northern Wei ruqun (X):

image

As for the skirts, they were wrapped relatively high around the waist, with the ends of the sash trailing down the front. The skirts were typically long and finely pleated. Below – additional historical recreations of Northern Wei ruqun from 裝束复原 and 朝代復原体验

image
image
image

Finally, when it came to hairstyles, Northern Wei women tended to do their hair up into two buns, in order to look slender and more elegant (X):

image

I hope this helps give you a better idea of what Mulan might have actually worn when not on the battlefield, and good luck! Also, if anyone has more insights into Northern Wei hanfu, please do share! ^^

Sources: 1, 2, 3

changan-moon: Traditional Chinese hanfu and ma…

changan-moon:

Traditional Chinese hanfu and makeup of various dynasty by 杭州纳兰

Hanfu Hairstyle Masterpost

fouryearsofshades:

For hanfu gathering, it is polite to tie one’s hair (if one’s hair is long enough to be tied up) – this apply for all sexes. It doesn’t have to be complex, even a pony tail is good enough. If one wants to try other hair style, here are some tutorials.The links are in Chinese unfortunately. There are many buns tutorial online, those may work as well.

Some hairstyle in the post may look ridiculous for daily life. Do pick suitable hairstyle for the occasion. Generally the first few links for each category are relatively simple and suitable for all occasions, then it moves on to more elaborate hairstyle for elaborate occasions and dresses. 

Double buns

image

[photograph by 蹦跶蹦儿]

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永乐宫壁画仙女造型一

永乐宫壁画仙女造型二

Other types of buns

简单的盘发和【发带】使用

简单日常发型教程(jian yi)

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【发型教程七】明制发型【大概算吧…】

仿唐百合髻

古风御姐造型

借鉴敦煌雕塑发髻

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古装舞台造型无头套下的处理方式

汉风新娘盘发视频教程
 

汉服新娘造型(一)

汉服新娘造型(二)

Manly bun

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This is not a bun. Not advice to do this kind of half-tied hairstyle (for all sexes), although it did looked nice here. [photograph by 秋月半弯]

汉服男子束发方法图解教程

教你束男子发型。

How to use traditional method to stick the hair

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Updated: June 2015