Category: ji li

cultureincart:

cultureincart:

Students of Qing’an High School attend a traditional adulthood ceremony in Xi’an, capital of northwest China’s Shaanxi Province, May 1, 2014. Students dressed in Hanfu, a traditional Chinese clothing, participated in the ceremony marking their growing up.

fouryearsofshades: 鸽子花下的成人礼 www.sc.xinhuane…

fouryearsofshades:

鸽子花下的成人礼

www.sc.xinhuanet.com

  2014年05月03日 08:35  来源: 新华网四川频道  

    5月2日,四川省荥经县龙苍沟国家森林公园。当日,16岁的荥经县少女王梦宇在荥经县龙苍沟举行了成人礼。鸽子花下,王梦宇通过初加一拜、二加二拜、三加三拜、置醴醮子、取字揖谢等传统仪程完成了她的成人礼,整个成人礼仪式过程中穿插古典舞表演、“冠(笄)之礼”介绍等。王梦宇同学以对父母、师长、家乡山河的三次拜礼,表达了自己的感恩之心,和把自己做到最好的决心。

   四川省荥经县龙苍沟国家森林公园通过举行汉服成人礼,旨在激励和鼓舞汉民族个体成员成长,增强当代青少年的责任感,弘扬中国的传统礼仪。龙苍沟国家森林公园有10万余亩野生珙桐林,珙桐花也叫鸽子花,有“植物界的大熊猫”、“和平使者”之美称。新华社记者 江宏景摄

A traditional Chinese coming-of-age ceremony for women (Ji Li), with the participants wearing hanfu.

Hello! If you don't mind, can you describ…

Hello! If you don't mind, can you describe what hairstyles for men would've looked like in the past? I tried searching on Google images, but I keep getting modern hairstyles. Thank you in advance!

Hi, thanks for the question! I assume you’re referring to pre-Qing dynasty hairstyles for men. 

I recommend reading Politics of Men’s Hair in Chinese History for historical context on Chinese men’s hairstyles. I gave a summary of the various types of men’s hair accessories in this post, and went into more detail on the “Guan” (formal headdress) in this post. I also have a men’s headwear tag you can check out.

I condensed the following information from Wikipedia

In the past, both males and females would stop cutting their hair once they reached adulthood. As children they could cut and wear their hair however they wanted. However, once they reached the age of adulthood (20 for men and 15 for women), they underwent the Chinese coming-of-age ceremony (called Guan Li/冠礼 for men and Ji Li/笄礼 for women). They allowed their hair to grow long naturally until death, including facial hair.

This was due to Confucius’ teaching that “our bodies – to every hair and bit of skin – are received by us from our parents, and we must not…injure or wound them. This is the beginning of filial piety”. Below – cartoons depicting typical hairstyles of different ages:

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Below – depiction of Guan Li (male coming-of-age ceremony). During the Guan Li, the man’s hair was combed into a bun and capped with a special headpiece:

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When a man entered adulthood, he had to tie his long hair into a bun called Ji/髻 either on or behind his head and cover the bun up with different kinds of headdresses. Below – tutorial of how to create the bun:

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A hair stick called Zan/簪 goes across the bun to stabilize the hair, like so:

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From looking at the Terracotta Warriors, you can see that (at least during the Qin Dynasty) there were variations in the bun’s placement and shape, as well as different ways of braiding the hair:

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The Chinese TV series Nirvana in Fire does a good job of portraying these distinctive braids:

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Men would wear hats and headdresses over their hair, which often signified the wearer’s profession or social rank. Below – some of the many, many head-wear options for men:

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Thus the ‘disheveled hair’, a common but erring depiction of ancient Chinese male figures seen in most modern Chinese period dramas or movies with hair hanging down from both sides and/or in the back, is historically inaccurate. 

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However, I won’t deny that this hairstyle can look very good – there’s a reason why it’s such a popular depiction nowadays 😛

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Now some might wonder (as I did) why Jia Baoyu, the principal male character in the classic Chinese novel Dream of the Red Chamber, is always depicted with ‘disheveled hair’, even in paintings and operas, if it’s historically inaccurate:

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However, it makes sense if you consider that Jia Baoyu is an adolescent during the story. His hairstyle is used to indicate his status as a not-yet adult man.

While the Chinese male bun hairstyle, worn from the earliest times of Chinese history up to the end of the Ming dynasty, has all but disappeared from modern society, it is still worn as a regular hairstyle by one group of people: Taoist priests and practitioners. Below – modern-day Taoists: 

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Hope this helps!

fouryearsofshades: 冠(笄)之礼是我国汉民族传统的成人仪礼,是汉民族重要…

fouryearsofshades:

冠(笄)之礼是我国汉民族传统的成人仪礼,是汉民族重要的人文遗产。华夏先祖对于冠礼非常重视,所谓“冠者礼之始也”“男子二十冠而字”。成人礼作为人生礼仪的重要组成部分之一,对个体成员成长的激励和鼓舞作用非常之大。今天,作为文明的传承者,子衿汉服社将带领大家学习、创新和实践新的冠(笄)礼,通过男子加冠取字,女子加笄命字,让民族传统礼仪对振奋民族精神文明、激励青年人的成长发挥应有的作用。
时间:五月二十五日,下午三时
地点:文化广场
(via 子衿甲午成人礼_广院子衿汉服社吧_百度贴吧)

Artist @云中居的子莫子  http://www.weibo.com/u/2751346803

Posters for traditional Chinese coming-of-age ceremonies called “Guan Li/冠礼” for men & “Ji Li/笄礼” for women. During the Guan Li, the man’s hair is combed into a bun and capped with a special headpiece (although nowadays I think they just do the capping part because most men have short hair). During the Ji Li, the woman’s hair is coiled into a bun and held in place with an ornate hairpin. 

Notice how each poster depicts two versions of the same person – before and after becoming an “adult”.