Category: kimono

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Hello. This is way-off topic but I was watchin…

Hello. This is way-off topic but I was watching figure skating with a friend. There was a Japanese skater skating to a piece of soundtrack for a Chinese film. I thought her costume is heavily influenced by Hanfy styles; it reminded me of a parallel-collar ruqun. But my friend disagrees and says it loos more like a kimono. If you google "Marin Honda 2018 Free Skate" you'll see what it was about (the pink dress). For the record the music is from House of Flying daggars; the composer is Japanese.

Hi, thanks for the question!

You’re correct – Marin Honda’s (gorgeous!) figure skating costume here is indeed based on hanfu, not kimono. Let’s look at the reasons why:

First of all, Marin’s costume is referencing Zhang Ziyi’s pink outfit in the Chinese film House of Flying Daggers, which is itself stylized costume hanfu:

Next, Marin’s costume incorporates the hanfu element of moxiong/抹胸, a traditional Chinese undergarment for the chest. While moxiong is an undergarment, it’s partly visible when worn with hanfu styles such as parallel-collar ruqun and beizi, and therefore also serves as a decorative accessory. There is no such equivalent undergarment worn with kimono. Below – comparison between Marin’s costume (left) and parallel-collar ruqun worn with embroidered white moxiong (right):

Which brings me to my next point – Marin’s costume has parallel-collars, which are common in hanfu (parallel-collar ruqun, beizi, etc), but are not found in kimono (except for outerwear, such as haori). The parallel-collar + moxiong combination is a very distinctive design that is unique to hanfu. Below – comparison between Marin’s costume (top left) and various parallel-collar ruqun:

In addition to parallel-collar ruqun, Marin’s costume bears many similarities to beizi. As mentioned before, moxiong are often worn with beizi. Also, the translucent pink part of her costume has parallel-collars and side slits, just as beizi does (the skirt of a ruqun does not have side slits). Below – comparison between Marin’s costume (left) and beizi (right):

For comparison, let’s take a look at two figure skating costumes that are based on kimono (below). Notice how both costumes are cross-collared. That in itself doesn’t differentiate them from hanfu, because hanfu also has crossed-collars, but there is one element that does – the wide “obi” that is tied in the back. Generally speaking, kimono is tied in the back, and hanfu is tied in the front. If you see a costume that is tied in the back, you can safely assume it’s probably kimono, as opposed to hanfu: 

Finally, speaking of figure-skating costumes based on “House of Flying Daggers”, I also really like Karen Chen’s costume that’s based on Zhang Ziyi’s blue outfit. The incorporation of traditional Chinese water sleeves is absolutely stunning!

Hope this helps!

Hello. This is way-off topic but I was watchin…

Hello. This is way-off topic but I was watching figure skating with a friend. There was a Japanese skater skating to a piece of soundtrack for a Chinese film. I thought her costume is heavily influenced by Hanfy styles; it reminded me of a parallel-collar ruqun. But my friend disagrees and says it loos more like a kimono. If you google "Marin Honda 2018 Free Skate" you'll see what it was about (the pink dress). For the record the music is from House of Flying daggars; the composer is Japanese.

Hi, thanks for the question!

image

You’re correct – Marin Honda’s (gorgeous!) figure skating costume here is indeed based on hanfu, not kimono. Let’s look at the reasons why:

First of all, Marin’s costume is referencing Zhang Ziyi’s pink outfit in the Chinese film House of Flying Daggers, which is itself stylized costume hanfu:

image
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Next, Marin’s costume incorporates the hanfu element of moxiong/抹胸, a traditional Chinese undergarment for the chest. While moxiong is an undergarment, it’s partly visible when worn with hanfu styles such as parallel-collar ruqun and beizi, and therefore also serves as a decorative accessory. There is no such equivalent undergarment worn with kimono. Below – comparison between Marin’s costume (left) and parallel-collar ruqun worn with embroidered white moxiong (right):

image

Which brings me to my next point – Marin’s costume has parallel-collars, which are common in hanfu (parallel-collar ruqun, beizi, etc), but are not found in kimono (except for outerwear, such as haori). The parallel-collar + moxiong combination is a very distinctive design that is unique to hanfu. Below – comparison between Marin’s costume (top left) and various parallel-collar ruqun:

image

In addition to parallel-collar ruqun, Marin’s costume bears many similarities to beizi. As mentioned before, moxiong are often worn with beizi. Also, the translucent pink part of her costume has parallel-collars and side slits, just as beizi does (the skirt of a ruqun does not have side slits). Below – comparison between Marin’s costume (left) and beizi (right):

image

For comparison, let’s take a look at two figure skating costumes that are based on kimono. Notice how both costumes are cross-collared. That in itself doesn’t differentiate them from hanfu, because hanfu also has crossed-collars, but there is one element that does – the wide “obi” that is tied in the back. Generally speaking, kimono is tied in the back, and hanfu is tied in the front. If you see a costume that is tied in the back, you can safely assume it’s probably kimono, as opposed to hanfu: 

image

Finally, speaking of figure-skating costumes based on “House of Flying Daggers”, I also really like Karen Chen’s costume that is based on Zhang Ziyi’s blue outfit. The incorporation of traditional Chinese water sleeves is absolutely stunning!

image
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Hope this helps!

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