Category: makeup

changan-moon: Traditional Chinese hanfu and ma…

changan-moon:

Traditional Chinese hanfu and makeup of various dynasty by 杭州纳兰

Hello! I was wondering if I could ask you a qu…

Hello! I was wondering if I could ask you a question about something I noticed in post 136427994491 (and in tradition Chinese photography in general). I've noticed that there are sometimes a red marking on a women's forehead. Do these markings mean anything? I'm particularly curious about the one that looks like a flower and the ones that are a dot

Hi, of course I’m happy to answer your question!

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The forehead markings are called “huadian/花鈿", and they are a purely ornamental type of accessory that was most popular during the Tang Dynasty. Huadian came in a variety of colors (red, green, yellow – but mostly red), shapes (flowers/petals, animals – birds/fish, etc.), and materials (paint, paper, gold, pearls, petals, fish bones, seashells, feathers, etc.). Nowadays it is usually painted on/a temporary tattoo. Fouryearsofshades has a write-up on huadian here. Below – historical huadian:

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Huadian can be worn on the cheeks, as seen in the two left pictures in the 2nd row above – these are called mianye/面靥 or xiaoye/笑靥. They usually took the form of a dimple about one centimeter from each side of the lips, and came in a variety of shapes, including coins, peaches, birds, and flowers.

There is a legend about the origin of huadian, recounted by Hua Mei in the book Chinese Clothing (pdf):

“The Huadian or forehead decoration was said to have originated in the South Dynasty, when the Shouyang Princess was taking a walk in the palace in early spring and a light breeze brought a plum blossom onto her forehead. The plum blossom for some reason could not be washed off or removed in any way. Fortunately, it looked beautiful on her, and all of a sudden became all the rage among the girls of the commoners. It is therefore called the “Shouyang makeup” or the “plum blossom makeup.” This makeup was popular among the women for a long time in the Tang and Song Dynasties.”

The flower/petal shapes typically represent the plum blossom. I’m not sure if the dot represents anything significant, besides being a common shape.

Below – actresses wearing huadian and mianye in film/tv:

image

Hope this helps! 🙂 

Edit: See here for post identifying the the actresses/films/tv series in the compilation above.

ziseviolet: dressesofchina: Tang-dynasty makeu…

ziseviolet:

dressesofchina:

Tang-dynasty makeup routine

The 7 steps are:

1) Powdering the face

2) Rouging the cheeks

3) Drawing the eyebrows

4) Decorating the forehead with ornamental designs called Huadian/花钿

5) Dotting the cheeks with ornamental designs called Mianye/面靥

6) Painting the temples with crescent-shaped designs called Xiehong/斜红

7) Coloring the lips

Hello! I was wondering if I could ask you a qu…

Hello! I was wondering if I could ask you a question about something I noticed in post 136427994491 (and in tradition Chinese photography in general). I've noticed that there are sometimes a red marking on a women's forehead. Do these markings mean anything? I'm particularly curious about the one that looks like a flower and the ones that are a dot

Hi, of course I’m happy to answer your question!

image

The forehead markings are called “huadian/花鈿", and they are a purely ornamental type of accessory that was most popular during the Tang Dynasty. Huadian came in a variety of colors (red, green, yellow – but mostly red), shapes (flowers/petals, animals – birds/fish, etc.), and materials (paint, paper, gold, pearls, petals, fish bones, seashells, feathers, etc.). Nowadays it is usually painted on/a temporary tattoo. Fouryearsofshades has a write-up on huadian here. Below – historical huadian:

image

Huadian can be worn on the cheeks, as seen in the two left pictures in the 2nd row above – these are called mianye/面靥 or xiaoye/笑靥. They usually took the form of a dimple about one centimeter from each side of the lips, and came in a variety of shapes, including coins, peaches, birds, and flowers.

There is a legend about the origin of huadian, recounted by Hua Mei in the book Chinese Clothing (pdf):

“The Huadian or forehead decoration was said to have originated in the South Dynasty, when the Shouyang Princess was taking a walk in the palace in early spring and a light breeze brought a plum blossom onto her forehead. The plum blossom for some reason could not be washed off or removed in any way. Fortunately, it looked beautiful on her, and all of a sudden became all the rage among the girls of the commoners. It is therefore called the “Shouyang makeup” or the “plum blossom makeup.” This makeup was popular among the women for a long time in the Tang and Song Dynasties.”

The flower/petal shapes typically represent the plum blossom. I’m not sure if the dot represents anything significant, besides being a common shape.

Below – actresses wearing huadian and mianye in film/tv:

image

Hope this helps! 🙂 

Edit: See here for post identifying the the actresses/films/tv series in the compilation above.

dressesofchina:Tang-dynasty makeup routine The…

dressesofchina:

Tang-dynasty makeup routine

The 7 steps are:

1) Powdering the face

2) Rouging the cheeks

3) Drawing the eyebrows

4) Decorating the forehead with ornamental designs called Huadian/花钿

5) Dotting the cheeks with ornamental designs called Mianye/面靥

6) Painting the temples with crescent-shaped designs called Xiehong/斜红

7) Coloring the lips

inkjadestudio: Wang Yifan (born in 92 in Liao…

inkjadestudio:

Wang Yifan (born in 92 in Liaoning, China) has been busy trying to recreate traditional Chinese makeup from old recipes.

There are Eng subs but the translation is not so good…

Do you know what sort of material was used in …

Do you know what sort of material was used in traditional Chinese makeup? Did they have similar issues with toxic makeup products as Europe? Sorry, historical makeup is just so fascinating to me!

Hi, thanks for the question!

image

Makeup in ancient China was created by boiling and fermenting ingredients such as plants, animal fats, and spices.

Facial powder (foundation) was one of the most rudimentary forms of makeup that was made by grinding fine rice. Another form of powder was made using lead, which despite its toxicity, was coveted for its skin-whitening properties.

image

Rouge, powder used to color the lips or cheeks, was made from the extracted juice of leaves from red and blue flowers. Ingredients such as bovine pulp and pig pancreas were also known to have been added, to make the product denser. 

Lip makeup was made from the raw material vermilion, a scarlet pigment originally made from the powdered mineral cinnabar. Eventually mineral wax and animal fat were added, making the vermilion water-proof with a strong adhesive force. In order to add fragrance, raw materials such as ageratum and clove, and artificial flavors were added.

image

To paint their eyebrows, women used the soot derived from burning willow branches. Another type of eyebrow makeup was made using dai, a blue mineral that was grinded into powder and mixed with water.

image

From the Tang Dynasty and onwards, huadian, a decorative element located on the forehead, came into vogue. Huadian was often created using gold or silver foil, paper, fish scales, or even dragonfly wings (or just painted on). I have a detailed post about huadian here.

image

Finally, nail polish originated in China (!!) and dates back to 3000 BC.

To paint their nails, the ancient Chinese used a mixture of egg whites, gelatin, beeswax, gum Arabic, alum, and flower petals.

image

Hope this helps!

Sources: 1, 2, 3

Do you know what sort of material was used in …

Do you know what sort of material was used in traditional Chinese makeup? Did they have similar issues with toxic makeup products as Europe? Sorry, historical makeup is just so fascinating to me!

Hi, thanks for the question!

image

Makeup in ancient China was created by boiling and fermenting ingredients such as plants, animal fats, and spices.

Facial powder (foundation) was one of the most rudimentary forms of makeup that was made by grinding fine rice. Another form of powder was made using lead, which despite its toxicity, was coveted for its skin-whitening properties.

image

Rouge, powder used to color the lips or cheeks, was made from the extracted juice of leaves from red and blue flowers. Ingredients such as bovine pulp and pig pancreas were also known to have been added, to make the product denser. 

Lip makeup was made from the raw material vermilion, a scarlet pigment originally made from the powdered mineral cinnabar. Eventually mineral wax and animal fat were added, making the vermilion water-proof with a strong adhesive force. In order to add fragrance, raw materials such as ageratum and clove, and artificial flavors were added.

image

To paint their eyebrows, women used the soot derived from burning willow branches. Another type of eyebrow makeup was made using dai, a blue mineral that was grinded into powder and mixed with water.

image

From the Tang Dynasty and onwards, huadian, a decorative element located on the forehead, came into vogue. Huadian was often created using gold or silver foil, paper, fish scales, or even dragonfly wings (or just painted on). I have a detailed post about huadian here.

image

Finally, nail polish originated in China (!!) and dates back to 3000 BC.

To paint their nails, the ancient Chinese used a mixture of egg whites, gelatin, beeswax, gum Arabic, alum, and flower petals.

image

Hope this helps!

Sources: 1, 2, 3

Are the lips of tang dynasty makeup suppose to…

Are the lips of tang dynasty makeup suppose to resemble flower petals?

Hi, thanks for the question! (Photos via 当小时)

image

Tang dynasty makeup, like the rest of Tang culture, was vibrant and glamorous. 

Florid styles of lip makeup were popular – the color of red for lips included red, light red, red with golden powder, pink, etc. Women first put powder onto the lips, and then drew any pattern they liked. During the Tang, many patterns for lip makeup were invented. According to one record, there were 17 patterns in the last 30 years of the dynasty. Below – depictions of Tang lip patterns by 睿汐_Sai:

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Out of all the lip patterns, the most popular were the “cherry” lips and “flower petal” lips. Cherry lips refer to lips with the shape and color of a cherry. According to traditional Chinese beauty ideals, a beautiful woman should have a “cherry mouth” that resembles a cherry by being small, cherry-shaped, ruddy, and lustrous. Below – recreations by Chen Yen-hui:

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Another famous pattern took the shape of a little flower – “flower petal” lips. To make it, women first made an obvious depression in the middle of the upper lip. Then the upper lip contour took the shape of two petals, and the lower lip another petal. 

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There were many more Tang lip patterns, but the above two were the most popular.

Bonus – Here are some lip patterns from other Chinese dynasties (X). From left to right, top to bottom – Han, Wei, Song, Ming, Qing, Qing:

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For more references on traditional Chinese lip makeup, please see my makeup tag.

Hope this helps! (Source)

Wang Yifan (born in 92 in Liaoning, China) has…

Wang Yifan (born in 92 in Liaoning, China) has been busy trying to recreate traditional Chinese makeup from old recipes.

There are Eng subs but the translation is not so good…