Category: makeup

inkjadestudio: Unboxing Pechoin 百雀羚 Hand Cream…

inkjadestudio:

Unboxing Pechoin 百雀羚 Hand Cream

I consider myself a hand cream connoisseur but these has got to be the most fancily packaged hand creams I have ever bought! So much so I decided to take photos.

Pechoin 百雀羚 is an old Chinese cosmetics company founded in Shanghai in 1931. It was something your Chinese grandma used but now they have been rebranding themselves to appeal to young Chinese women.This is the result. 

This set of three hand creams based on Chinese herbal extracts (orchid, camellia and osmanthus respectively) also came with a free green tube of exfoliating cream packaged in a fancy metal box.There are also 9 complimentary bookmarks printed with classical Chinese poetry as you can see in the last photo.

More info:


The rebirth of Pechoin (a Chinese Beauty Brand)


Asia’s Consumers Snubbing Global Brands for These Products

More famously recently, Peng Liyuan (President Xi Jinping’s wife) has given Pechoin skincare products as diplomatic gifts to foreigners.

whitehorseisnotahorse: the50-person: xiao3la4…

whitehorseisnotahorse:

the50-person:

xiao3la4jiao1:

 A collection of art depicting Chinese women’s hairstyles over the years, from

行者先生 on weibo (link

It’s obvious how beauty standards have evolved greatly over the years…what one might consider a beauty in the past might not be the same now, and vice versa. 

Tbh, if the Four Great Beauties all time-travelled to the present, I wonder if they’ll still be as praised?

Also, whenever someone says they like Tang Dynasty makeup and hairstyles, I’m usually all ‘you know what you’re saying?’ because while Tang hanfu is lovely, the makeup and hair isn’t exactly what people now (2010s) will consider flattering.

While Tang dynasty makeup can be a bit Out There* it doesn’t hold a candle to the face-wide crimson shading and applique crystals look the Song empresses seem to have been going for. (I’m pretty ignorant about what may have led to any of those things being popular, or whether this is something restricted to imperial women, so if anyone has anymore info, give me a plug!)

I love how the crowns have full sets of figurines crafted into them!

* Although those moth eyebrows speak to my soul. 

Fig. 1 

The Official Imperial Portrait of Empress Liu (969–1033) (detail), hanging scroll, Palace Museum Taipei

Fig. 1  The Official Imperial Portrait of Empress Zheng (1079–1131)

(detail), hanging scroll, Palace Museum Taipei

Fig. 1  The Official Imperial Portrait of Empress Wu (1114–1197)

(detail), hanging scroll, Palace Museum Taipei

(link for first pick) (link for the second pic) (link to source for the third pic) 

I keep seeing these red markings on the forehe…

I keep seeing these red markings on the foreheads of girls wearing hanfu, what exactly are they?

Those red forehead markings are called Huadian. I wrote about Huadian in my posts here and here, so please check them out! ^^ (Image Via)

Hello! I was wondering if I could ask you a qu…

Hello! I was wondering if I could ask you a question about something I noticed in post 136427994491 (and in tradition Chinese photography in general). I've noticed that there are sometimes a red marking on a women's forehead. Do these markings mean anything? I'm particularly curious about the one that looks like a flower and the ones that are a dot

Hi, of course I’m happy to answer your question!

image

The forehead markings are called “huadian/花鈿", and they are a purely ornamental type of accessory that was most popular during the Tang Dynasty. Huadian came in a variety of colors (red, green, yellow – but mostly red), shapes (flowers/petals, animals – birds/fish, etc.), and materials (paint, paper, gold, pearls, petals, fish bones, seashells, feathers, etc.). Nowadays it is usually painted on/a temporary tattoo. Fouryearsofshades has a write-up on huadian here. Below – historical huadian:

image

Huadian can be worn on the cheeks, as seen in the two left pictures in the 2nd row above – these are called mianye/面靥 or xiaoye/笑靥. They usually took the form of a dimple about one centimeter from each side of the lips, and came in a variety of shapes, including coins, peaches, birds, and flowers.

There is a legend about the origin of huadian, recounted by Hua Mei in the book Chinese Clothing (pdf):

“The Huadian or forehead decoration was said to have originated in the South Dynasty, when the Shouyang Princess was taking a walk in the palace in early spring and a light breeze brought a plum blossom onto her forehead. The plum blossom for some reason could not be washed off or removed in any way. Fortunately, it looked beautiful on her, and all of a sudden became all the rage among the girls of the commoners. It is therefore called the “Shouyang makeup” or the “plum blossom makeup.” This makeup was popular among the women for a long time in the Tang and Song Dynasties.”

The flower/petal shapes typically represent the plum blossom. I’m not sure if the dot represents anything significant, besides being a common shape.

Below – actresses wearing huadian and mianye in film/tv:

image

Hope this helps! 🙂 

Edit: See here for post identifying the the actresses/films/tv series in the compilation above.

Not sure if this has been asked before, but wh…

Not sure if this has been asked before, but what are the little red flower designs on the forehead called? They look super cute! ^^

Hi, thanks for the question!

image

The little red flower designs on the forehead – that you often see on Hanfu wearers and in Chinese media & arts – are traditional Chinese accessories called Huadian/花钿, which came into vogue during the Tang dynasty. Please check out this post that I made on the history of Huadian.

image

Since they first appeared, Huadian have been an enduring symbol of beauty in Chinese culture. 

image

Huadian come in many colors and shapes, in addition to red flowers/petals. 

image

For more references, please check out my Huadian tag!

image

Hope this helps!

Images via: 1, 2, 34, 5

Hello! I was wondering if I could ask you a qu…

Hello! I was wondering if I could ask you a question about something I noticed in post 136427994491 (and in tradition Chinese photography in general). I've noticed that there are sometimes a red marking on a women's forehead. Do these markings mean anything? I'm particularly curious about the one that looks like a flower and the ones that are a dot

Hi, of course I’m happy to answer your question!

image

The forehead markings are called “huadian/花鈿", and they are a purely ornamental type of accessory that was most popular during the Tang Dynasty. Huadian came in a variety of colors (red, green, yellow – but mostly red), shapes (flowers/petals, animals – birds/fish, etc.), and materials (paint, paper, gold, pearls, petals, fish bones, seashells, feathers, etc.). Nowadays it is usually painted on/a temporary tattoo. Fouryearsofshades has a write-up on huadian here. Below – historical huadian:

image

Huadian can be worn on the cheeks, as seen in the two left pictures in the 2nd row above – these are called mianye/面靥 or xiaoye/笑靥. They usually took the form of a dimple about one centimeter from each side of the lips, and came in a variety of shapes, including coins, peaches, birds, and flowers.

There is a legend about the origin of huadian, recounted by Hua Mei in the book Chinese Clothing (pdf):

“The Huadian or forehead decoration was said to have originated in the South Dynasty, when the Shouyang Princess was taking a walk in the palace in early spring and a light breeze brought a plum blossom onto her forehead. The plum blossom for some reason could not be washed off or removed in any way. Fortunately, it looked beautiful on her, and all of a sudden became all the rage among the girls of the commoners. It is therefore called the “Shouyang makeup” or the “plum blossom makeup.” This makeup was popular among the women for a long time in the Tang and Song Dynasties.”

The flower/petal shapes typically represent the plum blossom. I’m not sure if the dot represents anything significant, besides being a common shape.

Below – actresses wearing huadian and mianye in film/tv:

image

Hope this helps! 🙂 

Edit: See here for post identifying the the actresses/films/tv series in the compilation above.

changan-moon: Traditional Chinese hanfu and ma…

changan-moon:

Traditional Chinese hanfu and makeup of various dynasty by 杭州纳兰

Hello! I was wondering if I could ask you a qu…

Hello! I was wondering if I could ask you a question about something I noticed in post 136427994491 (and in tradition Chinese photography in general). I've noticed that there are sometimes a red marking on a women's forehead. Do these markings mean anything? I'm particularly curious about the one that looks like a flower and the ones that are a dot

Hi, of course I’m happy to answer your question!

image

The forehead markings are called “huadian/花鈿", and they are a purely ornamental type of accessory that was most popular during the Tang Dynasty. Huadian came in a variety of colors (red, green, yellow – but mostly red), shapes (flowers/petals, animals – birds/fish, etc.), and materials (paint, paper, gold, pearls, petals, fish bones, seashells, feathers, etc.). Nowadays it is usually painted on/a temporary tattoo. Fouryearsofshades has a write-up on huadian here. Below – historical huadian:

image

Huadian can be worn on the cheeks, as seen in the two left pictures in the 2nd row above – these are called mianye/面靥 or xiaoye/笑靥. They usually took the form of a dimple about one centimeter from each side of the lips, and came in a variety of shapes, including coins, peaches, birds, and flowers.

There is a legend about the origin of huadian, recounted by Hua Mei in the book Chinese Clothing (pdf):

“The Huadian or forehead decoration was said to have originated in the South Dynasty, when the Shouyang Princess was taking a walk in the palace in early spring and a light breeze brought a plum blossom onto her forehead. The plum blossom for some reason could not be washed off or removed in any way. Fortunately, it looked beautiful on her, and all of a sudden became all the rage among the girls of the commoners. It is therefore called the “Shouyang makeup” or the “plum blossom makeup.” This makeup was popular among the women for a long time in the Tang and Song Dynasties.”

The flower/petal shapes typically represent the plum blossom. I’m not sure if the dot represents anything significant, besides being a common shape.

Below – actresses wearing huadian and mianye in film/tv:

image

Hope this helps! 🙂 

Edit: See here for post identifying the the actresses/films/tv series in the compilation above.

ziseviolet: dressesofchina: Tang-dynasty makeu…

ziseviolet:

dressesofchina:

Tang-dynasty makeup routine

The 7 steps are:

1) Powdering the face

2) Rouging the cheeks

3) Drawing the eyebrows

4) Decorating the forehead with ornamental designs called Huadian/花钿

5) Dotting the cheeks with ornamental designs called Mianye/面靥

6) Painting the temples with crescent-shaped designs called Xiehong/斜红

7) Coloring the lips

Hello! I was wondering if I could ask you a qu…

Hello! I was wondering if I could ask you a question about something I noticed in post 136427994491 (and in tradition Chinese photography in general). I've noticed that there are sometimes a red marking on a women's forehead. Do these markings mean anything? I'm particularly curious about the one that looks like a flower and the ones that are a dot

Hi, of course I’m happy to answer your question!

image

The forehead markings are called “huadian/花鈿", and they are a purely ornamental type of accessory that was most popular during the Tang Dynasty. Huadian came in a variety of colors (red, green, yellow – but mostly red), shapes (flowers/petals, animals – birds/fish, etc.), and materials (paint, paper, gold, pearls, petals, fish bones, seashells, feathers, etc.). Nowadays it is usually painted on/a temporary tattoo. Fouryearsofshades has a write-up on huadian here. Below – historical huadian:

image

Huadian can be worn on the cheeks, as seen in the two left pictures in the 2nd row above – these are called mianye/面靥 or xiaoye/笑靥. They usually took the form of a dimple about one centimeter from each side of the lips, and came in a variety of shapes, including coins, peaches, birds, and flowers.

There is a legend about the origin of huadian, recounted by Hua Mei in the book Chinese Clothing (pdf):

“The Huadian or forehead decoration was said to have originated in the South Dynasty, when the Shouyang Princess was taking a walk in the palace in early spring and a light breeze brought a plum blossom onto her forehead. The plum blossom for some reason could not be washed off or removed in any way. Fortunately, it looked beautiful on her, and all of a sudden became all the rage among the girls of the commoners. It is therefore called the “Shouyang makeup” or the “plum blossom makeup.” This makeup was popular among the women for a long time in the Tang and Song Dynasties.”

The flower/petal shapes typically represent the plum blossom. I’m not sure if the dot represents anything significant, besides being a common shape.

Below – actresses wearing huadian and mianye in film/tv:

image

Hope this helps! 🙂 

Edit: See here for post identifying the the actresses/films/tv series in the compilation above.