Category: ming dynasty

daivietcophong-vietnamancient:

daivietcophong-vietnamancient:

Brief illustration of women’s clothes during Le Dynasty (Vietnam) and Ming Dynasty (or Minh dynasty, China) – around the same time 

vietphuc: Since the 14th century, the mandarin…

vietphuc:

Since the 14th century, the mandarin uniform with mandarin squares were applied through the three Sinospheric countries of China, Korea, and Vietnam. The colors of the dresses and the designs of the squares would determine the wearers’ ranks and status.

How would one be able to distinguish a Ming Chinese, a Joseon Korean, and a Lê Vietnamese government official through looks alone?

  • Korean round collars were more oval in shape, and the belts would reach the wearers’ chests
  • Vietnamese would have long flowing hair, black teeth, and much shorter robes

Source: Sử Quán Cổ Phong

From left to right: government official’s attire of China, Korea, and Vietnam.

vietphuc: In ancient Sinosphere, the most pre…

vietphuc:

In ancient Sinosphere, the most prestigious attire of any person, whether man or woman, in the culture of 華夏 was the ruler’s ceremonial attire, 袞冕. This was the most prestigious religious attire for emperors and kings, and the amount of pearl fringes on one’s crown determined one’s status. Ming dynasty was the last Han period that donned this dress, with a 12-fringed crown, denoting the highest of order in ancient China, while Japan, Korea, and Vietnam all continued this tradition. However, Korea continued to wear 9-fringed crowns to represent its kingship, while Vietnam wore 12-fringed crowns for its emperors and Japan wore 48-fringed crowns for its imperial majesties.

Source: Đại Hoà Cổ Phong

From left to right: ruler’s ceremonial attire of (Ming) China, Korea, Vietnam, and Japan.

ancientviet: Traditional wedding costumes of S…

ancientviet:

Traditional wedding costumes of Sinosphere countries. From left to right:

China, Ming Dynasty, Hanfu
Korea, Joseon Dynasty, Hanbok
Vietnam, Nguyen Dynasty, áo Nhật Bình (for women) and áo tấc (for men)
Japan, Tokugawa Shogunate, Kimono
Ryukyu (now Okinawa)

changan-moon: Nanjing brocade 南京云锦 by 匠仓

changan-moon:

Nanjing brocade 南京云锦 by 匠仓

Photo

Photo

ziseviolet: cfashthings: Source: Weibo Traditi…

ziseviolet:

cfashthings:

Source: Weibo

Traditional Chinese Hanfu.

cfashthings:

cfashthings:

Source: Weibo

Traditional Chinese Hanfu.

dressesofchina: niniaday: Feng Zhiwei/Wei Zhi…

dressesofchina:

niniaday:

Feng Zhiwei/Wei Zhi outfits

All of her female costumes are  Tang-dynasty ruquns, while most of her male costumes are Song and Ming-dynasty stylings.

changan-moon: Fèng guān凤冠(Phoenix Crown) of Ch…

changan-moon:

Fèng guān凤冠(Phoenix Crown) of Chinese empresses, Qing dynasty and Ming dynasty, collected in the Forbidden city, Beijing.  Actually the first red crown is for high-ranked imperial concubines whose title is fēi妃, and people call them huáng fēi皇妃. The second red crown with more gold ornaments is for the empress who is the only wife of emperor by ancient law, her title is hòu后 and is always called huáng hòu皇后 by people. Huáng皇 means imperial/royal. 

But pay attention that the title fēi妃 also applies to the wife of prince because her status is inferior to the status of empress/huáng hòu皇后, for example, the wife of prince is called wáng fēi王妃, and if the prince is tài zǐ太子(crown prince), then his wife is tài zǐ fēi太子妃. 

In English the wife of prince can be called princess, same as the daughter of emperor. However in Chinese the wife of prince and the daughter of emperor don’t share the same title. Usually the daughter of emperor is considered more superior than the wife of prince in ancient China, for the latter probably doesn’t own royal blood. The daughter of emperor is called huáng nǚ皇女 which straightly means ‘imperial/royal daughter’. If she is especially in favor with the emperor or her mother is the empress, then she would be given the distinguished title gōng zhǔ公主 by emperor himself, so not every huáng nǚ皇女 can be called gōng zhǔ公主. There are even variations in the title gōng zhǔ公主, such as dà gōng zhǔ大公主(most noblest daughter of emperor), zhǎng gōng zhǔ长公主(most noblest sister of emperor), dà zhǎng gōng zhǔ大长公主(most noblest sister of the father of emperor, his aunt).