Category: moxiong

Traditional Chinese Hanfu.

Traditional Chinese Hanfu.

fouryearsofshades: 桑纈 Traditional Chinese …

fouryearsofshades:

桑纈

Traditional Chinese Hanfu.

Hello! You have a lovely blog! Sorry if you&#…

Hello! You have a lovely blog! Sorry if you've been asked this before; Do you know of any online stores that sell traditional chinese dresses and such? As well as traditional chinese accessories?.. Thank you!

Hi, I’m delighted that you find my blog lovely! ^^

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Please see my “Where To Buy Hanfu” page for all of my information, posts, and replies regarding where to find and buy traditional & modern Chinese hanfu and accessories. I recently just revamped the page, so it now contains links to all of my replies to previous asks about buying hanfu. I also updated the list of hanfu and accessory brands. Please check it out! 

PS – I also have “About”“Tags”, and “Replies” pages for additional information and resources.

Hope this helps! ^^

Photo via 葵花花花儿, Hanfu from 风熏堂

fouryearsofshades: 纨绮汉服工作室   形制:短褙子/宋抹/褶裙 选料:…

fouryearsofshades:

纨绮汉服工作室 

 形制:短褙子/宋抹/褶裙

选料:真丝丝麻短褙子(S/M/L)提花棉抹胸(S/M)真丝丝麻褶裙(珍珠纱挂里)(S/M/L)工艺:双面包边缝/挂里


形制:长褙子/宋抹/褶裙选料:真丝丝麻长褙子/提花棉抹胸/ 真丝丝麻褶裙(珍珠纱挂里)工艺:双面包边缝/挂里

Traditional Chinese Hanfu – Type: Song dynasty-style Beizi/褙子.

How to tell the difference between the kinds o…

How to tell the difference between the kinds of undergarments?

Hi, thanks for the question!

There are two categories of undergarments for hanfu: Zhong Yi/中衣 (middle clothes) and Nei Yi/内衣 (inner clothes). As you can guess, the hanfu that is worn as the outermost layer is called Wai Yi/外衣 (outer clothes).

1) Zhong Yi are worn by both males and females. Appearance-wise they look like regular hanfu, but they can only be worn inside of other clothes. They are usually white, but can be other colors as well. Going outside with only Zhong Yi on is regarded as impolite, but they can be worn as lounge-wear and/or pajamas at home. Zhong Yi is required when dressing in formal attire for important events.

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For females (note – the top can be tucked into the skirt):

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For males:

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Here’s a photo of Zhong Yi:

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2) Nei Yi commonly refers to the chest undergarments that women wear with hanfu. They play the same role as a brassiere does, but they are longer, covering the belly as well. Their appearance has changed throughout history, as can be seen in picture below:

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For the sake of simplicity, I will just introduce the type of Nei Yi that is currently the most commonly worn with hanfu: Mo Xiong/抹胸. The Mo Xiong is the square/rectangular undergarment that is exposed when paired with parallel-collar ruqun (left – pink Mo Xiong) and beizi (right – blue Mo Xiong):

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The Mo Xiong can come with or without straps. Here is how to wear the strapless version:

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And here are some Mo Xiong with straps:

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For further info/pics, I have an underwear tag you can take a look at.

Hope this helps!

Regular

anonymous asked:

Do you have a collection of Song Dynasty styles, and can you say a bit more about them? PS, you’re my favorite aesthetic blog!

Hi, thanks for the question! I’m honored to be your favorite aesthetic blog 😀

Song dynasty styles are characterized by straight, slender, long silhouettes, with narrow sleeves. This was in keeping with the Song people’s preference for reserved elegance (compared to, for example, the extravagant fashions of the Tang dynasty).

Song styles for women include ru/襦, qun/裙 (skirt), beizi/褙子 (jacket), banbi/半臂 (half-sleeve jacket), Song ku/宋裤 (Song-style trousers), shan/衫, ao/袄, etc. Outfits are accessorized with pibo/披帛(long scarf), weichang/围裳 (short outer skirt), and waist ornaments.

The illustration below depicts the characteristic outfits of the Song, Tang, and Ming dynasties. As can be seen on the left, the outfits most representative of the Song dynasty are the ruqun and beizi.

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Ruqun (left) & beizi (right):

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While the ruqun was commonly worn throughout most of Chinese history, the beizi became really popular during the Song dynasty. The beizi is a parallel-collar jacket with side slits beginning at the armpit or at the waist. It can be different lengths – above the knee, below the knee, or ankle length. The sleeves can be broad or narrow. During the Song, it was common to wear narrow-sleeved beizi over moxiong/抹胸 (chest undergarment) or ru on top, and skirt or trousers on bottom. Paintings and artifact of Song-style beizi:

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Modern Song-style beizi:

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The Song dynasty is also unique in that it was common for women to wear trousers (usually with beizi). Song-style trousers:

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The simplicity and convenience of Song style have made it a common source of inspiration for hanyuansu (hanfu-inspired fashion).

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Additional resources can be found in my Song dynasty tag.

Hope this helps!

How to tell the difference between the kinds o…

How to tell the difference between the kinds of undergarments?

Hi, thanks for the question!

There are two categories of undergarments for hanfu: Zhong Yi/中衣 (middle clothes) and Nei Yi/内衣 (inner clothes). As you can guess, the hanfu that is worn as the outermost layer is called Wai Yi/外衣 (outer clothes).

1) Zhong Yi are worn by both males and females. Appearance-wise they look like regular hanfu, but they can only be worn inside of other clothes. They are usually white, but can be other colors as well. Going outside with only Zhong Yi on is regarded as impolite, but they can be worn as lounge-wear and/or pajamas at home. Zhong Yi is required when dressing in formal attire for important events.

image

For females (note – the top can be tucked into the skirt):

image

For males:

image

Here’s a photo of Zhong Yi:

image

2) Nei Yi commonly refers to the chest undergarments that women wear with hanfu. They play the same role as a brassiere does, but they are longer, covering the belly as well. Their appearance has changed throughout history, as can be seen in picture below:

image

For the sake of simplicity, I will just introduce the type of Nei Yi that is currently the most commonly worn with hanfu: Mo Xiong/抹胸. The Mo Xiong is the square/rectangular undergarment that is exposed when paired with parallel-collar ruqun (left – pink Mo Xiong) and beizi (right – blue Mo Xiong):

image

The Mo Xiong can come with or without straps. Here is how to wear the strapless version:

image

And here are some Mo Xiong with straps:

image

For further info/pics, I have an underwear tag you can take a look at.

Hope this helps!