Category: qing dynasty

changan-moon: Fèng guān凤冠(Phoenix Crown) of Ch…

changan-moon:

Fèng guān凤冠(Phoenix Crown) of Chinese empresses, Qing dynasty and Ming dynasty, collected in the Forbidden city, Beijing.  Actually the first red crown is for high-ranked imperial concubines whose title is fēi妃, and people call them huáng fēi皇妃. The second red crown with more gold ornaments is for the empress who is the only wife of emperor by ancient law, her title is hòu后 and is always called huáng hòu皇后 by people. Huáng皇 means imperial/royal. 

But pay attention that the title fēi妃 also applies to the wife of prince because her status is inferior to the status of empress/huáng hòu皇后, for example, the wife of prince is called wáng fēi王妃, and if the prince is tài zǐ太子(crown prince), then his wife is tài zǐ fēi太子妃. 

In English the wife of prince can be called princess, same as the daughter of emperor. However in Chinese the wife of prince and the daughter of emperor don’t share the same title. Usually the daughter of emperor is considered more superior than the wife of prince in ancient China, for the latter probably doesn’t own royal blood. The daughter of emperor is called huáng nǚ皇女 which straightly means ‘imperial/royal daughter’. If she is especially in favor with the emperor or her mother is the empress, then she would be given the distinguished title gōng zhǔ公主 by emperor himself, so not every huáng nǚ皇女 can be called gōng zhǔ公主. There are even variations in the title gōng zhǔ公主, such as dà gōng zhǔ大公主(most noblest daughter of emperor), zhǎng gōng zhǔ长公主(most noblest sister of emperor), dà zhǎng gōng zhǔ大长公主(most noblest sister of the father of emperor, his aunt).

fuckyeahchinesefashion: Antique Chinese fashio…

fuckyeahchinesefashion:

Antique Chinese fashion, Gongdeng宫灯(palace lantern) earrings made by huasi花丝 technique in Qing dynasty. By Chrison克里森 

philamuseum: These Chinese scepters made in d…

philamuseum:

These Chinese scepters made in different materials were given as good luck and longevity symbols on birthdays and new year celebrations, particularly by the 18th century emperor Qianlong. The word ruyi means “as you wish.” Now on view in gallery 226.

Ruyi Scepter,” 18th century, China 

Ruyi Scepter,” 19th century, China 

Ruyi Scepter,” 19th century, China 

Ruyi Scepter,” 18th century, China 

Story of Yanxi Palace (延禧攻略)

naanima:

“Story
of Yanxi Palace (延禧攻略)”
is a 70 episodes palace drama set in 18th century Beijing. It is the
story of Wei Yingluo, a young woman who enters the court of the Qianlong
Emperor, as a seamstress/servant to find out the truth behind her older
sister’s murder.

This show is worthy of your time for the
duration of the full 70 episodes. Unlike other dramas (Rise of Phoenixes so
disappoints) Yanxi Palace is fast paced, every two to three episodes shit goes
down and get resolved while the main arc continues on in the background. It is
beautifully shot, edited with excellent cinematography. The cast is excellent
across the board. And the women, oh gods, the women are amazing.

Wei Yingluo is smart and cunning, and 100%
committed to vengeance and retribution. She discovers information that led her
to believe that the imperial guard Fucha Fuheng was her sister’s killer. So,
our badass female lead set herself up to be noticed by his sister the Empress
Fucha. Her mission is a success and gets transferred to Changchun Palace as a
maid/servant to Empress Fucha. Except the longer she interacts with the Empress
and Fuheng the more she realises the two are actually really good people. She
basically ends up worshipping the ground Empress Fucha walks on, and starts to
fall for Fuheng.

Here is Empress Fucha; she is kind,
intelligent and beautiful. She teaches WYL how to write, read and try to teach
WYL how to be kind and righteous person, um, with relative success. WYL worships the ground she walks on, and will CHOOSE HER OVER ANYTHING AND ANYONE. Like, screw the men, this is her true love. I kid. Sort of.

Here is her brother Fucha Fuheng. He is
righteous, smart and strict, but there is a sense of humour hiding beneath his
pretty face. He and WYL theoretically have the tragic romance, but they are SIGNIFICANTLY different than other tragic romances because BOTH OF THEM ARE STILL INTELLIGENT. They recognise their position and their responsibilities and WYL’s vengeance. All women either love or hate him. We love the character, the
actor is currently up in the air.

WYL ends up running into Emperor Qianlong
on several occasions, all of them leading to the Emperor coming out of it the
loser. So, you can imagine the Emperor is not exactly a fan of WYL. But she is
saved  from punishments through her
smarts, luck and the fact she is the Empress’ favourite.

Here is Emperor Qianlong. I fucking love him, he isn’t technically likable but he is an Emperor. You go through eps where you
hate him and then eps where you want to hug him. At the end of the day he is
the Emperor and that influences everything he does and how he reacts to the
world. Half of my joy in the later eps is watching WYL and QL figure each other
out and their back and forth in an attempt to get the upper hand.

 Warning: Qianlong is not a nice person, he is
a good Emperor.

 Worthy of mention:

Hoifa-Nara Shushen, Consort Xian; the kind and neutral consort who doesn’t want to choose a side between the Empress and Consort Gao

 

I FUCKING LOVE THIS SHOW.

This show is beautiful from set designs to costumes to the damn lighting. The story is so damn fast paced, and I have never seen a female character like WYL on the screen before, that’s include Western media. Her single minded focus on vengeance and choosing the women in her life over the men is something so damn refreshing. I call her my little rage murder machine… except she is willing to wait for decades to pull her plans. WEI YING LOU!!!!!!  

I WANT TO WRITE A POST ABOUT EVERY CHARACTER BUT I DON’T HAVE THE TIME. 

IF YOU CAN ONLY WATCH ONE CHINESE DRAMA THIS YEAR, STORY OF YANXI PALACE IS THAT DRAMA.

fuckyeahchinesefashion:

fuckyeahchinesefashion:

Posters of 如懿传

If it weren't for the Qing Dynasty,we wil…

If it weren't for the Qing Dynasty,we will be wearing modern day Hanfu and we will see Hanfu inspired fashion featured in Chinese fashion shows right?

Hi, thanks for the question!

image

It’s hard to say what would’ve happened if certain historical events had been different. For example, even if the Qing dynasty had not existed, we can’t say for sure what would have been in its stead. It could’ve been another foreign-ruled dynasty, for instance. However, if the Ming dynasty had continued uninterrupted, or if it had been followed by another Han Chinese-ruled dynasty – then yes, most likely, we would be wearing modern day Hanfu and we would see Hanfu-inspired fashion featured in Chinese fashion shows.

image

However, there’s no need to imagine what “could’ve been”, because we’re seeing it right now thanks to the hanfu revival movement. These days, wearing Hanfu – both traditional and modified – is becoming more popular, and more Hanfu-inspired fashion is appearing in Chinese fashion shows ^^

image

Hope this helps!

(Images via 汉尚华莲/Hanshang Hualian)

The Great Chinese Art Heist

The Great Chinese Art Heist: undefined

ziseviolet: hongvanngh: Ref for my OC, but it…

ziseviolet:

hongvanngh:

Ref for my OC, but it’s too beautiful to not spread the love

Lips make up in Tang Dynasty style

These are actually lip makeup styles from various Chinese dynasties. From left to right, top to bottom: Qing, Tang, Song, Ming, Wei, Tang, Qing, Han, Tang, Ming.

hongvanngh: Ref for my OC, but it’s too beaut…

hongvanngh:

Ref for my OC, but it’s too beautiful to not spread the love

Lips make up in Tang Dynasty style

These are actually lip makeup styles from various Chinese dynasties. From left to right, top to bottom: Qing, Tang, Song, Ming, Wei, Tang, Qing, Han, Tang, Ming.

philamuseum: These Chinese scepters made in d…

philamuseum:

These Chinese scepters made in different materials were given as good luck and longevity symbols on birthdays and new year celebrations, particularly by the 18th century emperor Qianlong. The word ruyi means “as you wish.” Now on view in gallery 226.

Ruyi Scepter,” 18th century, China 

Ruyi Scepter,” 19th century, China 

Ruyi Scepter,” 19th century, China 

Ruyi Scepter,” 18th century, China