Category: tang dynasty

fuckyeahchinesefashion:

fuckyeahchinesefashion:

Local customs and practices in the capital city of Tang dynasty by 长安十二时辰

Is this hairstyle,peony pinned on her hairstyl…

Is this hairstyle,peony pinned on her hairstyle,outfit restricted to royal 👑 ladies only

Hi, thanks for the question! 

The painting you’re referring to is the famous Tang dynasty hand scroll by Zhou Fang, “Court Ladies Wearing Flowered Headdresses/簪花仕女图”. This scroll depicts five palace ladies and a maidservant amusing themselves in a garden.  

The court ladies’ hairstyle is called Gao Ji/高髻 (High Ji), also known as E Ji/峨髻 (Lofty Ji). “Ji/髻” refers to any hairstyle involving pulling hair on top of the head. Gao Ji was a popular hairstyle among Chinese women during the Tang dynasty. As its names indicate, it refers to a relatively high and full updo, decorated with hair ornaments. Tang culture celebrated fullness and glamour, and that aesthetic extended to hair as well. Tang women believed the higher the hair, the better, with some using wigs to achieve the desired look – it was not uncommon for the updo to reach over one foot in height. Gao Ji was beloved by all classes of women during the Tang dynasty.

Gao Ji came in several different varieties. The specific one you’re referring to, with the peony pinned to the top, is called Zan Hua Gao Ji/簪花高髻 (Flowered High Ji). This style involved a Gao Ji embellished with huge peony or lotus blossoms, as well as gold hair ornaments.The practice of wearing flowers expressed women’s admiration for the beauty of the blossoms, but also symbolized the fleeting nature of youth.Zan Hua Gao Ji was especially popular among aristocratic women during the Tang dynasty.

Here are two modern depictions of the hairstyle:

Regarding the court ladies’ outfits – the relatively low neckline and nearly floor-length sleeves of the gowns, and the wide gauze scarves worn as stoles or draped across the arms, are all characteristic of the high court fashion of the Tang dynasty. I also addressed the same question in my reply to you here, so please check it out.

Hope this helps!

Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Is this hairstyle,peony pinned on her hairstyl…

Is this hairstyle,peony pinned on her hairstyle,outfit restricted to royal 👑 ladies only

Hi, thanks for the question! 

The painting you’re referring to is the famous Tang dynasty hand scroll by Zhou Fang, “Court Ladies Wearing Flowered Headdresses/簪花仕女图”. This scroll depicts five palace ladies and a maidservant amusing themselves in a garden.  

image

The court ladies’ hairstyle is called Gao Ji/高髻 (High Ji), also known as E Ji/峨髻 (Lofty Ji). “Ji/髻” refers to any hairstyle involving pulling hair on top of the head. Gao Ji was a popular hairstyle among Chinese women during the Tang dynasty. As its names indicate, it refers to a relatively high and full updo, decorated with hair ornaments. Tang culture celebrated fullness and glamour, and that aesthetic extended to hair as well. Tang women believed the higher the hair, the better, with some using wigs to achieve the desired look – it was not uncommon for the updo to reach over one foot in height. Gao Ji was beloved by all classes of women during the Tang dynasty.

Gao Ji came in several different varieties. The specific one you’re referring to, with the peony pinned to the top, is called Zan Hua Gao Ji/簪花高髻 (Flowered High Ji). This style involved a Gao Ji

embellished with huge peony or lotus blossoms, as well as gold hair ornaments.

The practice of wearing flowers expressed women’s admiration for the beauty of the blossoms, but also symbolized the fleeting nature of youth.

Zan Hua Gao Ji was especially popular among aristocratic women during the Tang dynasty.

image

Here are two modern depictions of the hairstyle:

image
image

Regarding the court ladies’ outfits – the relatively low neckline and nearly floor-length sleeves of the gowns, and the wide gauze scarves worn as stoles or draped across the arms, are all characteristic of the high court fashion of the Tang dynasty. I also addressed the same question in my reply to you here, so please check it out.

Hope this helps!

Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

sinethetamagazine: Eighty-seven Immortals (八十…

sinethetamagazine:

Eighty-seven Immortals (八十七神仙卷) by Wu Daozi (吳道子). Ink on silk handscroll. ca. 685–758 BCE.

Wu Daozi was a master painter of the Tang Dynasty. Born in the Henan province of China, Wu lived from circa 680 BCE to circa 760 BCE. Throughout his prolific career, Wu painted many Buddhist and Daoist murals. Wu was given the name Daoxuan by Emperor Xuanzhong after gaining appointment to the imperial court as the official painter. Due to Wu’s sage-like status in Chinese art history, critics regard him as divine and much of his life history intersects with myth and legend. 

“八十七神仙卷” translatets to “eighty-seven immortals,” or “eighty seven celestial people.”  During the Kaiyuan Era, reigning Emperor Xuanzhong allegedly commissioned this intricate piece to Wu for his recently-passed mother. The top image is the full scroll, and the following three images allow a closer look at the painting in three segments. An exemplary model of traditional 白描 (baimiao) style, which referes to an ordinary or plain painting style, the piece now resides in the Xu Beihong Memorial Museum in Beijing.

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Local customs and practices in the capital cit…

Local customs and practices in the capital city of Tang dynasty by 长安十二时辰

xiao3la4jiao1: chinaism: 仿唐百合髻 the remake of…

xiao3la4jiao1:

chinaism:

仿唐百合髻

the remake of Lily Knot from Tang Dynasty

it is the one of the most popular hairstyle for young girls at Tang Dynasty

cr:Niki-镜子

(Full tutorial)

xiao3la4jiao1: chinaism: 仿唐百合髻 the remake o…

xiao3la4jiao1:

chinaism:

仿唐百合髻

the remake of Lily Knot from Tang Dynasty

it is the one of the most popular hairstyle for young girls at Tang Dynasty

cr:Niki-镜子

(Full tutorial)

hi ! so less of a hanfu or style question… b…

hi ! so less of a hanfu or style question… but i was wondering what dynasty do you suppose ' the rise of the phoenixes ' uses mainly as it's material? i saw your post about the clothing style used seeming to be closely tied to tang the tang dynasty.

Hi! Yep, as I described in my post, the costumes in “The Rise of Phoenixes” mainly use the Tang dynasty as their reference material. If you look through my Tang dynasty tag, you can see how the clothes are very similar to those in the show ^^

Thank you for the reblog!But I would just like…

Thank you for the reblog!But I would just like to point out that in my art of Zhong Kui, he's not wearing an opera costume. He's wearing the clothes of his middle to late Tang Dynasty origin, give or take some artistic license. The one sleeve bared aesthetic was popular among athletic young men of the time, though they also tucked up the edges of their robes as well. The apples, however, are very much opera-inspired. See if you can name any masks!

I see, thanks for the additional info! I didn’t know that the one sleeve bared aesthetic was popular with athletic young men during the Tang dynasty – very fascinating! 

I’m not very familiar with Chinese opera unfortunately, so I can’t name most of the masks, but I do recognize the Sun Wukong one ^^/

hanfugallery: Traditional Chinese fashion in T…

hanfugallery:

Traditional Chinese fashion in Tang dynasty style | Photo by 叶洛 | Love her hair and dress, just like a lady walking out of an ancient Chinese painting.