Category: tang dynasty

ziseviolet: Portraits of several of the female…

ziseviolet:

Portraits of several of the female Buddhist donors depicted in the famous Dunhuang Murals from the Mogao Caves of China, by Chinese artist -阿舍-. The women are wearing traditional Chinese hanfu, jewelry, and makeup. (X)

 

Portraits 1-5: Cave 61 (Five Dynasties 907-960 AD). This cave was dedicated by the family of Cao Yuanzhong, military governor of the Guiyijun regime. The portraits depict the women of the Cao family.

Portrait 6: Cave 9 (Late Tang Dynasty

875-907 AD). The portrait depicts Lady He.

Portraits 7-9: Cave 130 (High Tang Dynasty 705-781 AD). This cave was dedicated by the family of Le Tinghuan, Satrap of Jinchang Prefecture. The portraits depict his wife Lady Wang (7) and their two daughters (8 & 9). 

Portraits of several of the female Buddhist do…

Portraits of several of the female Buddhist donors depicted in the famous Dunhuang Murals from the Mogao Caves of China, by Chinese artist -阿舍-. The women are wearing traditional Chinese hanfu, jewelry, and makeup. (X)

 

Portraits 1-5: Cave 61 (Five Dynasties 907-960 AD). This cave was dedicated by the family of Cao Yuanzhong, military governor of the Guiyijun regime. The portraits depict the women of the Cao family.

Portrait 6: Cave 9 (Late Tang Dynasty

875-907 AD). The portrait depicts Lady He.

Portraits 7-9: Cave 130 (High Tang Dynasty 705-781 AD). This cave was dedicated by the family of Le Tinghuan, Satrap of Jinchang Prefecture. The portraits depict his wife Lady Wang (7) and their two daughters (8 & 9). 

i-dragonqueen: Since I was told this was way …

i-dragonqueen:

Since I was told this was way too hard to read, I’m putting it here again in another format.

So again, short introduction to one of my favorite historical figures, Wu Zetian.

And again, credits to French artist Pénélope Bagieu (I only translated)

Take a look at those about Mae Jemison or N’Zinga!

望水试登山 山高湖又阔 相思无晓夕 相望经年月 郁郁山木荣 绵绵野花发 别后…

望水试登山
山高湖又阔
相思无晓夕
相望经年月

郁郁山木荣
绵绵野花发
别后无限情
相逢一时说

I gaze down at the lake as I try to climb this mountain
And the mountain seems as high as the lake is wide.
I miss you in a night that never ends.
I think of you through every day I live.

So fragrant these blossoms on the mountain trees
And the fields of wildflowers go on and on.
After we parted, I was overwhelmed.
So now I persuade myself that soon we’ll meet again.

hanfugallery:Traditional Chinese hanfu by 焦响乐_…

hanfugallery:

Traditional Chinese hanfu by 焦响乐_

dressesofchina: Cartoon drawings of Tang-dynas…

dressesofchina:

Cartoon drawings of Tang-dynasty paintings and figurines by 焦响乐

dressesofchina:

dressesofchina:

Cartoon drawings of Tang-dynasty paintings and figurines by 焦响乐

fate-magical-girls: Sui or Tang Dynasty noble…

fate-magical-girls:

Sui or Tang Dynasty noblewoman in ceremonial pheasant robes. With and without background. Done in Procreate App, October 2017

Lineart was done a long time ago, so proportions look a little strange

Chinese ceremonial clothing evolved over time. In the Northern and Southern Dynasties, women began wearing flower crowns, with the number of flowers denoting the wearer’s status. Contrary to popular misconception, for most of history, pheasants and not phoenixes decorated noble women’s robes. The lines of pheasants also denoted the wearer’s status. I’ve taken some liberties with the hair and jewels. During the Sui Dynasty, women braided their hair tightly. It was not until the Tang Dynasty that hairstyles became loose and fluffy. Women also did not wear earrings, especially not to formal occasions, before the Song Dynasty, as piercing the ears was seen as a barbarian custom.

fate-magical-girls: Sui or Tang Dynasty noble…

fate-magical-girls:

Sui or Tang Dynasty noblewoman in ceremonial pheasant robes. With and without background. Done in Procreate App, October 2017

Lineart was done a long time ago, so proportions look a little strange

Chinese ceremonial clothing evolved over time. In the Northern and Southern Dynasties, women began wearing flower crowns, with the number of flowers denoting the wearer’s status. Contrary to popular misconception, for most of history, pheasants and not phoenixes decorated noble women’s robes. The lines of pheasants also denoted the wearer’s status. I’ve taken some liberties with the hair and jewels. During the Sui Dynasty, women braided their hair tightly. It was not until the Tang Dynasty that hairstyles became loose and fluffy. Women also did not wear earrings, especially not to formal occasions, before the Song Dynasty, as piercing the ears was seen as a barbarian custom.

ziseviolet: dressesofchina: Tang-dynasty makeu…

ziseviolet:

dressesofchina:

Tang-dynasty makeup routine

The 7 steps are:

1) Powdering the face

2) Rouging the cheeks

3) Drawing the eyebrows

4) Decorating the forehead with ornamental designs called Huadian/花钿

5) Dotting the cheeks with ornamental designs called Mianye/面靥

6) Painting the temples with crescent-shaped designs called Xiehong/斜红

7) Coloring the lips